Get Ryse, Sniper, Homefront, and Cryengine assets in the new Humble Cryengine Bundle

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The Humble Cryengine Bundle (opens in new tab) is an interesting mix of games, and resources that could help you make games. The $1 entry tier gets you Rolling Sun, Aporia: Beyond the Valley, and The Land of Pain, all games; and Cryengine V Samples, Cryengine Webinar Training Videos, and the Crysis 3 Animation Pack—not the game, the assets. Crysis 3, sadly, is not part of this package. 

Ryse: Son of Rome is in there, however, along with Miscreated (in early access), Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2, UAYEB, the Snow Pro Pack DLC, an Underwater Demo level, a Robinson: The Journey asset pack, and the Ryse: Son of Rome asset pack, all of which are appended to the previous for beating the average price. And at $15, there's also Sniper: Ghost Warrior 3, Homefront: The Revolution, the Deceit asset pack, and The Climb asset pack. There's some World of Warships loot in there as well, a couple of soundtracks, and a coupon for half-off Robinson: The Journey. 

The Cryengine is available to all on a royalties-based payment model: The details are available in the terms and conditions, but the short version is that if you're interested in making games, this is a potentially good way to kick it off. (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, so if you're planning to make a "Real Game" you should probably consult one before you commit.) It's also not a bad way to pick up Ryse or Sniper: Ghost Warrior 3 on the cheap. 

The Humble Cryengine Bundle 2018 will be available until May 15.  

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Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.