Today's big Discord outage has mostly been resolved

A sad robot in Discord's logo illustration style, whose face is displaying a 'low battery' symbol.
(Image credit: Discord)
Audio player loading…

This article was updated with the latest information at 2:25 pm Pacific.

Discord says (opens in new tab) it has almost completely resolved a "widespread API outage" that blocked users from logging into the chat platform for hours on Wednesday. According to the company, login rate limits have been removed, and "Discord is almost back to normal."

Finally, we can all go back to sharing memes and annoying each other by talking too much during tense FPS skirmishes.

"Over the next hour, some Discord servers may continue to see some issues interacting with bots using slash commands," said the company. "As part of resolving the incident, we needed to reduce load on our databases and we turned down some parts of our slash command system."

Discord first reported the outage Wednesday morning at 11:49 am Pacific. At around noon, it said it had identified two issues, one with the API and another with one of its "database clusters." At that point, Discord limited the rate at which users could log in.

At 12:30 pm Pacific, Discord said that its systems were healthy again, but it wasn't until after 2 pm that access was restored for all users.

"We are going to complete our internal postmortem process to really dig in and understand exactly what happened here, but we really apologize for the inconvenience if you were unable to login today or had other issues," said the company.

You can follow Discord's server status updates here (opens in new tab). We'll update this article if problems persist.

See more
Tyler Wilde
Executive Editor

Tyler grew up in Silicon Valley during the rise of personal computers, playing games like Zork and Arkanoid on the early PCs his parents brought home. He was later captivated by Myst, SimCity, Civilization, Command & Conquer, Bushido Blade (yeah, he had Bleem!), and all the shooters they call "boomer shooters" now. In 2006, Tyler wrote his first professional review of a videogame: Super Dragon Ball Z for the PS2. He thought it was OK. In 2011, he joined PC Gamer, and today he's focused on the site's news coverage. His hobbies include amateur boxing and adding to his 1,200-plus hours in Rocket League.