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Best gaming keyboards in 2019

(Image credit: Future)

The best gaming keyboard means different things to different people. Just like buying the best gaming mouse, picking out the right keyboard can be a sensitive topic for some as the right set of peripherals can either make or break a gaming experience. Ultimately there may be no right answer for the best keyboard, just what's best for you, but we've collected some of our faves and their prices to help you find what you need.

Most gaming keyboards in our lineup share a similar expanded layout, with dedicated macro keys and media controls. If you're looking for something a little more petite, check out our roundup of the best mechanical keyboards instead. 

Your most important consideration besides the size will be your choice of switches. There is an ever-expanding library of switches to choose from, and while they may go by another name, they typically fall into one of three categories based on the overall feel. Of course, there is a whole spectrum of switches that bridge the areas between these three generalities, but these are the three most common. There are linear switches (Cherry MX Red, Razer Yellow) a staple in the gaming community for their ubiquity and uncomplicated action. Clicky (Cherry MX Blue, Razer Green) which offers a little more resistance and an audible click with each keypress. Finally, we have tactile switches (Cherry MX Brown, Razer Orange) which you feel, but don't necessarily hear.

An increasingly vocal complaint in the gaming sphere is how many third-party clients you need to keep everything running the way you want, and unfortunately, mechanical keyboards are no exception. Clients like Razer Synapse and Corsair iCue do offer granular control over your keyboard's preferences and in some cases can even adjust settings for other connected hardware. But if you're not keen on installing yet another 3rd party client you may want to keep things "in the family" so to speak.

Whether you're new to gaming keyboards or have been using one for years, we've collected our top picks for what we think are the best keyboards you can get for your gaming PC. Keyboards may not always be particularly expensive, but picking up on the right Black Friday deals may give you a few more options or at least save you a few bucks.       

Best gaming keyboards 2019

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(Image credit: Corsair)
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(Image credit: Corsair)

1. Corsair K95 RGB Platinum

The best gaming keyboard

Switch: Cherry MX Speed, Brown | Size: Full size | Backlights: RGB | Passthroughs: USB | Media Controls: Dedicated | Wristrest: Detachable

Supurb build quality
Extra set of keycaps
Expensive
Large footprint

When you want to go the extra mile and upgrade to the absolute best of the best, it's hard to find a better option than the Corsair K95 Platinum. The K95 Platinum is a big keyboard: its enormous footprint still requires some desk cleaning before it can be nested comfortably. But feature-wise, the K95 Platinum's got it all. Dedicated media controls and a USB pass-through, a metal volume wheel, RGB lighting. It even comes with an extra set of textured keycaps for the WASD keys. While it's expensive, you do know what you're getting for your money here, and throughout 2019 we've seen the price of the K95 dropping steadily.

We also love its detachable wristrest, which makes things super comfortable for long gaming sessions (and this keyboard is fantastic for strategy games and MMOs). The rubberized wristpad attaches magnetically and has two contrasting textures: one smooth side and one rough side. Switching sides is as easy as flipping it over, and the added comfort it brings is exceptional.

During our tests we noted excellent key responses, a decent spread of keys for most hand sizes, a satisfying tactile click to each press, and wonderfully dimpled keys to help you rest your fingers when you're not actually pressing down. While this all seems quite obvious, it shows that the K95 does the basics right, as well as including the fancy extras, and that's why it's top of the plank pile.

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2. HyperX Alloy Elite RGB

The gaming keyboard with extra flash and features

Switch: Cherry MX Blue, Brown, Red | Size: Full size | Backlights: Red | Passthroughs: USB | Media Controls: Dedicated | Wristrest: Detachable

Great feature set
Relatively affordable
Excellent range of Cherry MX switches
Software still needs work

For a board lit in up to 16.9 million colors, the HyperX Alloy Elite sports a relatively simple aesthetic while still packing the features we expect out of a quality gaming keyboard. It comes in your choice of Cherry MX Brown, Blue, and Red. What it lacks in a dedicated macro column it makes up for with its reasonable price and quality, durable design.

The HyperX Alloy Elite RGB leaves no box unchecked in features. It's equipped with dedicated media controls, USB passthrough, a detachable wristrest, and full RGB backlighting. To up its aesthetics, it also includes an extra set of silver keycaps for WASD and the first four number keys. The board supports full N-key rollover, meaning you never have to worry about key presses not registering. While there is a standard variant of the Alloy Elite available that lacks RGB, depression in this model's pricing has brought them almost to parity, and you can regularly find the 'luxury' model for around $130. 

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(Image credit: Razer)
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(Image credit: Razer)

3. Razer Cynosa Chroma

The best gaming keyboard for membrane enthusiasts

Interface: Wired USB | Keyboard backlighting: Per-key RGB | Programmable keys: All | Features: Per key RGB lighting, supports Windows 7+ and OSX 10.8+

Best feeling membrane keys available
Affordable
Per key RGB lighting
Lacks extra features

If even mecha-membrane keys don't suit you and you demand a fully membrane typing/gaming experience, the Cynosa is the deck for you. It has some of the best feeling, low profile membrane keys I've ever tested, and at a retail price of $59.99 is one of the most affordable gaming keyboards out there (past a certain threshold of quality). While it may lack some of the features a number of gaming boards pack in these days, stuff like a dedicated wrist rest or media controls, it does boast Razer's extensive RGB lighting, which can be programmed on a per key basis or applied by zones.

It's a solid, no frills, nice looking keyboard that's the best membrane option of a huge range that I've tested. There is a step-up version of the Cynosa available, but for $20 extra the only real addition is underglow RGB, so unless that kind of 'ground effects' package is massively appealing to you, I recommend you save your cash and invest in the base model.

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(Image credit: Logitech)


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(Image credit: Logitech)

4. Logitech K840

The best gaming keyboard for gamers on a budget

Switch: Logitech Romer-G | Size: Full size | Backlights: No | Passthroughs: No | Media Controls: Function key integrated | Wristrest: No

Actually looks good for a budget keyboard
Durable aluminum front plate
No dedicated macros, passthroughs, or even backlights
Shoddy pad-printed keycaps

Logitech's proprietary Romer-G switch is where the magic lies. Designed in collaboration with the Japanese switch giant Omron, it was traditionally reserved for Logitech's high-end boards. Now, they're served with the budget-friendly K840 for the first time. Because you're scoring the Romer-G switch at such a low price point, you’re not going to find any extras on the K840. Never mind dedicated macros and USB passthroughs, there isn’t even any backlighting. The keycaps also come with cheap, fragile pad printed lettering that's likely to wear off over time.

Best gaming mouse | Best gaming chair | Best gaming PC
Best VR headset | Best wireless gaming mouse | Best gaming monitor

Asus ROG Strix Scope

Asus ROG Strix Scope

5. Asus ROG Strix Scope

The best gaming keyboard for FPS lovers

Switch: Cherry MX RGB Blue, Brown, Red, Black, Silent Red, Speed Silver | Size: Full size | Backlights: RGB | Passthroughs: No | Media Controls: No | Wristrest: No

Understated focus on functionality
Wide Ctrl button
Full RGB lighting
No wrist rest
No passthroughs

Asus' ROG Strix Scope is a keyboard made for function over form. While it's festooned with the typical array of RGB lighting, the solid aluminium top plate sports an understated, industrial design that's welcome in an era where flash and spectacle too often take precedence. The Scope is a solid, durable, reliable keyboard that works exactly as advertised without the bloat of unnecessary gimmicks. And with a wide range of Cherry's RGB switches, replacing their less even 3mm LED solution for RGB, you can find the Scope in practically any flavor you'd like. 

It also has a few quality of life features to appeal to fans of shooters. Full macro customization is available, and the left Ctrl key has been broadened to make it easy to hit during a tense firefight without accidentally actuating other keys. The more compact form factor of the Scope also means that it (and all the other bottom row keys so often critical in an FPS) is really easy to reach down and smack when you need it.

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6. Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB

The best gaming keyboard for customization and ergonomics

Switch: Cherry MX Blue, Brown, Red | Size: Split tenkeyless | Backlights: RGB | Passthroughs: USB | Media Controls: No | Wristrest: Yes

Split keyboard and unique layout to reduce strain
Optional lift kit and wrist rests to improve ergonomics
Extremely customizable
Lift kit sold separately

The original Freestyle Edge from Kinesis was one of the best split ergonomic keyboards on the market, and the upgraded RGB model improves on the original in a number of key ways. It retains the split design, allowing you to set the two halves of the deck at shoulder width and reduce back, neck, and shoulder strain. The gap also lets you drop a flight stick or HOTAS in between them for space sims, or leave your controller within easy reach when you're typing in text chat or messengers between sessions. 

The braided cable that connects the two halves can be adjusted to accommodate larger peripherals, or made shorter if you're leaving that space empty and want to declutter your desk. The additional lift kit accessory, which unfortunately doesn't come bundled with the keyboard, attaches to the bottom of the wrist rests and lets you tilt the keyboard to face out towards your hands at angles of five, ten, or fifteen degrees. There's an acclimation period where you're getting used to the angle and layout, but beyond that initial adjustment it feels comfortable and natural having the deck angled outwards. 

The Freestyle Edge RGB is also incredibly customizable, with onboard storage for up to nine user profiles, ten dedicated macro keys on the left half, and the ability to customize every key individually (including on the entire layer that you access by pushing the Fn key). It's fully programmable without the use of any additional software, though it can also be customized through Kinesis' Smartset software for an even more granular experience. 

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7. Cooler Master MK850

The best gaming keyboard to replace a gamepad

Switch: Cherry MX Red | Size: Full size | Backlights: Full RGB | Passthroughs: USB | Media Controls: Dedicated | Wristrest: Yes

Unique, analog aimpad technology
Full media controls, including two scroll wheels
Dedicated macro keys
High resistance
Slightly awkward macro positioning

Cooler Master may not be the first name that springs to mind when you think of gaming keyboards, but the MK850 may very well change your mind. The headline feature of their latest peripheral offering is the aimpad technology built into a subset of the deck's keys, which transform them with the push of a button into analog inputs not unlike the analog stick on a gamepad. This means that you can push a key part of the way down and it'll register the input differently than pushing it all the way to the floor, the way you can tilt an analog stick slightly forward to walk in a 3rd person shooter or tilt it all the way to run. It's a useful feature, particularly in stealth or racing games, where analog input is an important factor and a traditional mouse and keyboard setup hasn't sufficed. 

It's not just the aimpad that makes the MK850 a great board, though. It's packed with the additional features that elevate a gaming keyboard, stuff like a row of dedicated macro keys and media controls (including two independent scroll wheels for controlling things like system volume or RGB brightness), USB passthroughs, and Cherry MX Red switches. And it's an attractive deck, with raised keycaps to highlight the backlighting, and a supportive magnetic wrist rest and anodized aluminum backplate. 

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(Image credit: Razer)

8. Razer Huntsman Elite

The best gaming keyboard to actuate at the speed of light

Switch: Razer Opto-mechanical | Size: Full size | Backlights: 16.8 million color RGB | Passthroughs: No | Media Controls: Dedicated | Wristrest: Detachable magnetic

Home to Razer's excellent opto-mechanical keys
Beautiful, fully lit, durable full sized board
No passthroughs
Steep price point

The Huntsman family of Razer keyboards is the only place in the world to find their opto-mechanical switch, and it's one of the best (and most technologically interesting) switches on the market. The opto-mechanical build eschews traditional metal contacts, and instead actuates by a beam of light that fires through the switch when the key is depressed, meaning actuation is almost instantaneous. The other major advantage of removing all the relatively frail, slender metal contact pieces from the switch is that they're rated as twice as durable as standard mechanical switches, up to 100 million keystrokes. They're tactile switches that actuate at 1.5 mm and 45g of force, meaning they're ridiculously easy to spam but still provide tactile feedback. They're also amazing for typing for much the same reason.

The rest of the Elite is well designed too, with a comfy detachable magnetic wrist rest, a full suite of dedicated media controls, and a multi-function dial that can be used for anything from altering your PC's volume to scrolling through lighting suites for the 16.8 million RGB color options. It also features some handy storage on the keyboard, so you can easily save your preferences to a profile that will travel with you if move it to a different machine. It's an excellent, fully-featured keyboard with some truly fantastic switches, though you'll pay a premium for the privilege of using them.

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9. SteelSeries Apex Pro

The best gaming keyboard for per-key actuation

Switch: Omnipoint Adjustable | Size: Full size | Backlights: 16.8 million color RGB | Passthroughs: Single USB | Media Controls: Dedicated via OLED | Wristrest: Detachable magnetic

Per key actuation allows for incredible customization
Robust feature set
Attractive, minimalist deck with full RGB
Switches aren't as satisfying as many of their counterparts

The Apex Pro may be built around one headline feature (its ability to individually set the actuation point for every key), but it's also an incredibly solid, competitive gaming keyboard even without that groundbreaking customization. That said, adjusting the actuation point on a key-by-key basis is an incredible boon, particularly for anyone that splits their time between typing and gaming. If you find you struggle to decide between a linear and tactile switch, the Apex Pro offers you a hybrid that can satisfy both needs in the same model. Set a deeper actuation for typing, or higher when you need to spam keys in a MOBA or MMO. Or if you find you're frequently nailing a particularly key by accident and blowing your cooldown, you can set it individually to require that you bottom out so you'll really need to push it with intention. 

The Apex Pro also features a novel OLED in the upper right hand corner of the board, which lets you alter the actuation (though only across the entire board uniformly; the per-key settings require the SteelSeries Engine software), handle media controls, or even display a tiny animated gif. While it's more gimmick than necessity, it's does let you alter some key settings without having to dig deep into a separate software suite. And the low profile of the chassis with the heightened key caps contributes to a very attractive aesthetic, with little to no wasted space around the edges of the board.

Jargon buster - keyboard terminology

Actuation Point

The height to which a key needs to be pressed before it actuates and sends an input signal to a device.

Clicky

A switch that delivers an audible click everytime it's pressed, generally right around the point of actuation.

Debounce

A technique to ensure that only one input registers every time a key is pressed.

Housing

The shell that surrounds the internal components of a switch.

Hysteresis

The result of the actuation point and reset point in a switch being misaligned. This generally means a key needs to be lifted off of further than normal before it can be actuated again. 

Linear

A switch that moves directly up and down, generally delivering smooth keystrokes without noise or tactile feedback.

Mechanical Keyboard

A keyboard built around individual switches for each key, rather than a membrane sheath mounted on a PCB.

Membrane Keyboard

A keyboard on which all the keycaps are mounted on a membrane sheath; when a key is pressed, a rubber dome depresses and pushes against the sheath and PCB beneath, actuating the key.

Stem

The component of a switch on which the keycaps are mounted on a mechanical keyboard.

Switch

The physical component of a mechanical keyboard beneath the keycaps on a mechanical keyboard. The switch determines how a key is actuated, whether or not it provides audible or tactile feedback with each press, and more.

Tactile

A switch that provides a 'bump' of feedback every time it's pushed.

Tenkeyless

A keyboard that lacks the right hand number pad.