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A Cyberpunk movie is now 'much more of a possibility' because of Keanu Reeves, says creator

(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)
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Cyberpunk 2077 (opens in new tab) and Keanu Reeves caused a bit of a stir at an otherwise quiet E3 this year, and Cyberpunk creator Mike Pondsmith reckons that all the attention it's getting will make movie spin-off more likely. 

In an interview with VGC (opens in new tab), the tabletop designer—who has also been consulting closely with CD Projekt Red on 2077—wasn't able to talk about the status of Cyberpunk's movie rights, but he noted that Keanu Reeves' involvement with the game will certainly help. 

"I can’t really say anything on [movie rights]," he told VGC. "But with Keanu Reeves being tied up in things, it’s become much more of a possibility."

If D&D managed to get multiple shitty movies, surely Cyberpunk deserves at least one? As Reeves himself pointed out, however, videogames don't need Hollywood stars (opens in new tab) to legitimise them. The Witcher 3 didn't need celebrity appearances to get Netflix to adapt the books. 

"I don't think [videogames] need legitimising," Reeves said. "If anything I'd say it's gone the other way. It's more of the influence gaming's had on, let's call it Hollywood." 

In this case, though, Reeves' appearance at E3 has definitely given the game's profile a boost, and who knows—maybe he could be talked into reprising his role in the movie.

Fraser Brown
Online Editor

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.