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So that's what gaming chairs were missing: Swarovski Crystals

Vertagear Swarovski gaming chair from various angles
(Image credit: Vertagear)
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Gaming chair manufacturers have really been pushing the boat out lately. If BMW's concept (opens in new tab) wasn't enough, nor Cooler Master's gaming egg (opens in new tab), Vertagear has teamed up with Swarovski to create a lavish gaming chair covered in Swarovski Crystals.

A crystal finish might not be for everyone, but I was expecting something plastered in gleaming glass from head to toe, when actually the Vertagear PL4500 Swarovski (opens in new tab) isn't that at all. The chair looks, for the most part, embroidered up the rear, with crystals where the lines of purple thread intersect. It's not all that different from the standard PL4500, really, albeit for the few flourishes and sparkling Vertagear logo.

From our small sample size in the office, it seems a moderately polarising chair. It's not something I'd buy, but I can see why people would, while Senior Hardware Ed. Alan Dexter remains totally unconvinced.

It's a bit of a mixed bag according to our 2019 review of the Vertagear PL4500 (opens in new tab), too. Benjamin Abbott writes at the time: "Rock-solid build-quality and excellent back support don’t distract from a large price tag and hard seat that grows uncomfortable over time."

The Swarovski look will cost you a little more than the standard fare. It's a $600 chair, which is over $100 more than the usual PL4500. Though that also comes with a 10-year warranty, which is right up there with the best gaming chairs (opens in new tab) around.

So is this gaming chair a fashion-forward fit or something of a swing and a miss? I rather like it, anyways, if only because it would be the perfect fit alongside G.Skill's Trident Z Royal RAM (opens in new tab).

Jacob Ridley
Jacob Ridley

Jacob earned his first byline writing for his own tech blog from his hometown in Wales in 2017. From there, he graduated to professionally breaking things as hardware writer at PCGamesN, where he would later win command of the kit cupboard as hardware editor. Nowadays, as senior hardware editor at PC Gamer, he spends his days reporting on the latest developments in the technology and gaming industry. When he's not writing about GPUs and CPUs, however, you'll find him trying to get as far away from the modern world as possible by wild camping.