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Gears 5 on Steam will run on Windows 7

(Image credit: Microsoft)

Windows 10 is far and away the dominant operating system on PC these days, but good ol' Windows 7 is still hanging in there: The most recent Steam Hardware and Software Survey indicates that more than 20 percent of users are still running it. And the good news for them is that when Gears 5 comes out, they'll actually be able to play it.

This was in question because the Gears 5 system requirements on the Microsoft Store indicate that Windows 10 is a hard requirement to run the game. But the minimum requirements on Steam say that Windows 7 64-bit will get the job done. When asked about it on Twitter, Gears multiplayer design director Ryan Cleven confirmed that the Steam listing is accurate.

The Steam version will also support Steam trading cards, achievements, cloud saves, controllers ("partial"), and cross-platform multiplayer, which I'm guessing is why an Xbox profile will be required even if you purchase on Steam.

Aside from the Windows 7 thing, the full requirements listed on Steam are identical to those on the Microsoft Store:

Minimum:

  • OS: Windows 7 SP1 64-bit, Windows 10 64-bit
  • Processor: AMD FX-6000 series | Intel i3 Skylake
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • Graphics: AMD Radeon R9 280 | NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760
  • DirectX: Version 12
  • Network: Broadband Internet connection
  • Storage: 80 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX compatible

Recommended:

  • OS: Windows 10 64-bit
  • Processor: AMD Ryzen 3 | Intel i5 Skylake
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • Graphics: AMD Radeon RX 570 | NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
  • DirectX: Version 12
  • Network: Broadband Internet connection
  • Storage: 80 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX compatible

Gears 5 comes to Steam on September 9, the same day it releases on the Windows Store, unless you purchase the Gears 5 Ultimate Edition, which will get you into the game four days earlier. And in case you missed it yesterday, check out the new Gears 5 story trailer from Gamescom.

Andy covers the day-to-day happenings in the big, wide world of PC gaming—the stuff we call "news." In his off hours, he wishes he had time to play the 80-hour RPGs and immersive sims he used to love so much.