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Call of Duty video hints at story, reveal coming this Sunday

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At the end of April, the Call of Duty website (opens in new tab) is updated. At the beginning of May, a teaser trailer is released. Yay, that's the true true, every year like the last, and 2014 won't break the cycle. On Sunday, Activision will reveal the next Call of Duty with the first teaser trailer and details on Game Informer (opens in new tab) , which has already posted a screenshot. The screenshot looks like this:

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I'm pretty sure the watermark isn't part of the game, but I can't be sure. Fire is confirmed, though. And we also know that Activision interviewed the founder of private security firm Blackwater (now called Academi under its current owners) in a mildly creepy mini-doc about the privatization of the military.

First it's Ghosts' paranoia over China, rare earth metals, and drones, and now it's the privatization of the military, which "leads you to wonder: with advanced weaponry, highly trained soldiers, billions of dollars at their disposal, and few regulations, what happens when they stop taking orders, and start taking over?"

I'm pretty sure what happens is a new Call of Duty, and I think my suspicions will be confirmed on Sunday. I'm a little uncomfortable with this new trend of posing frightening questions (among its successes, Blackwater also shot and killed 17 Iraqi civilians (opens in new tab) in 2007), and then building a CoD campaign around them. Why so serious? For such a bombastic and silly series, I expect bombastic and silly story premises—inciting fear might be better reserved for documentaries.

Tyler grew up in Silicon Valley alongside Apple and Microsoft, playing games like Zork and Arkanoid on the early personal computers his parents brought home. He was later captivated by Myst, SimCity, Civilization, Command & Conquer, Bushido Blade (yeah, he had Bleem!), and all the shooters they call "boomer shooters" now. In 2006, Tyler wrote his first professional review of a videogame: Super Dragon Ball Z for the PS2. He thought it was OK. In 2011, he joined PC Gamer, and today he's focused on the site's news coverage. After work, he practices boxing and adds to his 1,200 hours in Rocket League.