Stardew Valley is cheap in the Humble Sweet Farm Bundle

Stardew Valley
(Image credit: Concerned Ape)
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The Humble Sweet Farm Bundle (opens in new tab) is, as the name suggests, concerned with a life of raising crops and tending herds. But "farming," in this case, is defined very loosely. At the $1 tier, for instance, you get Niche, a "genetics survival game" in which you create and evolve your own species; MagiCat, a platformer about a cat in a hat (but not the hat); and Evergarden, a narrative puzzle game set in a magical forest.

Beat the average, currently a bit north of $7, and you'll also get Equilinox, a "relaxing nature game" that lets you create your own unique ecosystem of plants and animals; Ultimate Chicken Horse, a party platformer about forcing animals to perform life-threatening stunts; and Samorost 3, a wonderfully bizarre adventure about hippies in space.

The farming finally comes into focus for $10 or more, which will top the package off with Stardew Valley, the hit retro-fantasy about life on a farm you inherit from your grandfather. The other games in the bundle are worth the price of admission, but this is the real attraction: We called Stardew Valley "the PC's best farm-based RPG" in our 2019 ranking of the 100 best games on PC. It normally goes for $15 by itself on Steam, so this is a good way to pick it up on the cheap and get some really good bonus games on the side. (Samorost 3, my personal favorite, usually sells for $20, so that's a solid steal too.)

The bundle also includes the Niche, MagiCat, and Samorost 3 soundtracks. Funds raised will go to support Sweet Farm, "the first non-profit sanctuary in the world to address the impacts of factory farming across animals, plants, and the planet." It's available until February 4.

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Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.