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Oddworld Soulstorm should run well on gaming laptops

Oddworld Soulstorm
(Image credit: Oddworld Inhabitants)
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The sharp-looking 2.5D sidescroller Oddworld Soulstorm is out tomorrow, and you're not going to need a super-powered PC to play it.

More power under the hood is always better, of course, at least when it comes to playing games on your PC, but Oddworld Soulstorm's minimum requirement should be pretty manageable for most:

  • OS: Windows 7 64-bit
  • CPU: Intel Quad Core 1.7Ghz
  • Video: Nvidia GTX 670 or equivalent
  • RAM: 8GB
  • Storage: 20GB

The recommended spec isn't exactly a killer either:

  • OS: Windows 10 64-bit
  • CPU: Intel Quad Core 2.3 Ghz
  • Video: Nvidia GTX 970 or equivalent
  • RAM: 16GB
  • Storage: 20GB

We got a closer look at Oddworld Soulstorm during the Future Games Show in March. Creator Lorne Lanning narrated a brief demo showcasing both the classic sidescrolling perspective we're all familiar with and a more cinematic approach to visual storytelling, including pans, zooms, and pullbacks that makes the game's hero, Abe, "look like an insignificant speck in a vast industrial machine." 

Over the weekend, Oddworld Inhabitants showed off more, with a foursome of "quick look" videos on:

Looting and Crafting

Environments

Sneaking and Stealth

Managing Followers

Oddworld Soulstorm will be available on April 6 on the Epic Games Store. We haven't started on our review just yet, so we won't have a verdict on launch day, but we'll publish one as soon as we've finished the game and collected our thoughts. 

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.