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Night Call, the neo-noir taxi driver murder mystery, is coming in July

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Night Call is a "neo-noir narrative investigation game" about a taxi driver who roams the gloomy eventide streets of Paris, collecting fares, delivering riders, and solving murders—specifically the murders committed by a serial killer who the police believe to be you.

The solution to the mystery lies with your patrons. Get them to talk, listen carefully for clues, and put the pieces together before the police decide that closing the case is more important than catching the real killer. The passenger pool is made up of more than 70 characters, each with their own "gripping stories and detailed backgrounds." And guilt is transient: The killer in one game may be completely innocent in the next.

Publisher Raw Fury said Night Call "explores gritty, mature themes as a dark reflection of real life in the City of Lights," which is a lot, but I quite like the look of the trailer that was revealed at last year's PC Gaming Show (opens in new tab) at E3, and the black-and-white screens promise a deliciously neo-noir take on Paris at night. Layer a good story and interesting characters on top of that, and this could be a really sharp game. (And an easy one to confuse with Neo Cab (opens in new tab), another taxi-based mystery coming this year).

Night Call is available for wishlisting on Steam (opens in new tab), and while the store page doesn't currently have a release date listed, it's been set for July 17. Take a look at a few screens down below, give the soundtrack sampler a listen on SoundCloud (opens in new tab), and find out more at nightcall-game.com (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Raw Fury)

(Image credit: Raw Fury)

(Image credit: Raw Fury)

(Image credit: Raw Fury)

(Image credit: Raw Fury)

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.