Skip to main content

The Capcom hack may have affected just under 400,000 peoples' data

Thousands more people may have been affected by last November's ransomware attack on Capcom than first thought, the studio announced today.

Under the moniker "Ragnar Locker", Capcom's alleged attackers managed to leak details on several upcoming game releases—from Resident Evil Village's supposed April 2021 release on Xbox One and PS4, to Monster Hunter Rise's now-verified January Switch demo (via VG247).

But besides sales data and other financial data, last year's breach also compromised the personal information of 9 current and former Capcom employees. In a new press release (via GamesIndustry.Biz), however, the studio has since verified an additional 16,406 compromised individuals—reckoning the maximum number of potentially affected people could be as high as 390,000.

While that's a massive leak, the statement insists it only affected business partners, former employees and current staff. Capcom says the hack didn't affect game servers or payment systems, clarifying that all online transactions are handled by a third-party service provider and the publisher doesn't store this information. So it's probably fine to go buy a costume in Monster Hunter.

The release ends with a note that the studio's internal systems have "in large part recovered", though Capcom will continue to work with US and Japanese authorities.

"Capcom would once again like to reiterate its deepest apologies for any complications or concerns caused by this incident. As a company that handles digital content, it is regarding this incident with the utmost seriousness." The release ends saying Capcom will be "pursing legal options regarding criminal acts such as unauthorized access of its networks."

Natalie Clayton

20 years ago, Nat played Jet Set Radio Future for the first time—and she's not stopped thinking about games since. Joining PC Gamer in 2020, she comes from three years of freelance reporting at Rock Paper Shotgun, Waypoint, VG247 and more. Embedded in the European indie scene and having herself developed critically acclaimed small games like Can Androids Pray, Nat is always looking for a new curiosity to scream about—whether it's the next best indie darling, or simply someone modding a Scotmid into Black Mesa. She's also played for a competitive Splatoon team, and unofficially appears in Apex Legends under the pseudonym Horizon.