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Itch.io isn't taking any money from developers today

Itcheeoh
(Image credit: Itch.io)
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Indie digital storefront Itch.io is holding its first ever Creator Day (opens in new tab) today, which means that until midnight tonight it will take no cut from purchases made on its platform—the developers get it all.

"Developers, musicians, and artists will receive 100% of sales after taxes and payment processor fees," Itch.io said. "We hope to make this a regular event to give developers an excuse to share and promote their works."

There's no reference to other storefronts in the announcement, but it stands as a pretty clear counterpoint to Steam, which is facing increasing pressure (opens in new tab) from developers, publishers, and other sellers over the 30% cut it continues to take from most sales. Valve slightly reduced (opens in new tab) the amount it takes from some games in late 2018—instead of 30% across the board, it now only takes 25% on earnings over $10 million, and 20% on earnings in excess of $50 million—but that leaves out the vast majority of indie devs (the ones who would most benefit from a reduction in fees, in other words), and it pales in comparison to the 12% cut now taken by Epic Games and Microsoft (opens in new tab).

Itch.io takes an even more relaxed approach: Its default rate is 10%, and if developers want to drop that all the way to nothing, they can. (And today, they don't have a choice.)

To help get the wheels turning, Itch.io also has a Creator Day sale page (opens in new tab) going. As far as I can tell it's really just a roundup of stuff that's on sale anyway, but there are some good choices here:

Itch.io's Creator Day runs until 11:59 pm PT on May 14.

Thanks, RPS.

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.