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The Outer Worlds will have two main endings, plus a slideshow of other consequences

The Outer Worlds
(Image credit: Obsidian Entertainment)

One of the first questions asked of new story-driven and choice-based RPGs is "but do your choices matter?" It sounds like they will in The Outer Worlds, though in the same slideshow style of Fallout: New Vegas. 

“There are two basic paths at the end: whether you sided with Phineas or The Board," said co-director Leonard Boyarsky in an interview with VGC. “After that you get a whole series of slides that talk about the results of your actions and the consequences of the choices you made throughout the whole game.”

In the same interview, Boyarsky said that he hasn't totaled up all the possible combinations but that “they talk about the different people that you encountered, the different areas that you entered, how you solved certain quests and what that means for the future of the colony."

Like New Vegas' primary decision—which faction to side with in the battle for Hoover Dam—The Outer Worlds will have you choose between an alliance with Phineas Wells (the scientist who frees you from cryo-sleep) or The Board. This brings The Outer Worlds' biggest choice down to a binary decision: Do you side with the quirky scientist or the evil, omnipotent corporation? 

That said, Obsidian plans to acknowledge the player's other side quest choices. Along with not having a voice-acted main character, this seems like a decision by Obsidian to manage the scope of The Outer Worlds while leaving room for its personality to shine through.

As I'm known for telling anyone who asks, my favorite quest in Fallout: New Vegas involves seducing a man into a dumpster with the help of the Black Widow perk. If The Outer Worlds manages the same kind of ridiculous nihilism in its side quests and references my poor choices at the end, I may just be OK with only having two primary endings. 

Lauren loves long books and even longer RPGs. She got a game design degree and then, stupidly, refused to move to California. She plays indie games you haven't heard of and will never pass on a story about players breaking games or playing them wrong.