Skip to main content

Blizzard releases a Battle.net mobile app for Android and iOS

Audio player loading…

Back in 2012, Valve debuted a mobile version of Steam that it said would "expand the service functionality of Steam to make it richer and more accessible for everyone." Now Blizzard is making its own move into the world of portable account management with the release of a mobile version of its Battle.net software for Android and iOS devices. 

"If you've ever wanted to see what games your friends are playing while you’re headed home on the bus, or quickly add a new friend you've met out on the town, now you can with the Blizzard Battle.net mobile app," the announcement says. "Available for iOS and Android, the Blizzard Battle.net mobile app brings social features from the Blizzard Battle.net desktop app to your phone." 

Unfortunately, that's all it does: You can add friends via their Battletag, email address, or QR code, chat with them, and mark yourself as online, away, or busy. But there's no option to purchase or install games remotely, and the Authenticator remains a separate app.   

The Steam mobile app was no great shakes when it launched, as I recall, and so hopefully the Battle.net app will follow a similar path toward improvement, or at least an evolution toward more general usefulness. For now, it's a handy way to keep in touch with clanmates when you're away from you're PC, and as long as that's all you're after, you'll be set. It is also free, which is an undeniable plus: Get the Android version here, and the iOS version here.

Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.