So yeah, there are actually RTX 4090 and RTX 4080 Black Friday gaming PC deals

iBuyPower and CyberPowerPC RTX 40-series gaming PCs
(Image credit: iBuyPower, CyberPowerPC)
iBuyPower Intel 13th Gen Extreme Gaming PC | RTX 4090 | Core i9 13900K | 32GB RAM | 2TB SSD | $3,579 (opens in new tab)

iBuyPower Intel 13th Gen Extreme Gaming PC | RTX 4090 | Core i9 13900K | 32GB RAM | 2TB SSD | $3,579 $3,238.55 at iBuyPower with promo code 'BFMonth' (save $340.45) (opens in new tab)
The RTX 4090 at MSRP would account for half this machine's price, then factor in the inflated price of the Core i9 chip, and you're already at $2,329 just for those two components on their own. iBuyPower is actually knocking $20 off the standard build price as it's shipping the GPU not installed, to avoid issues in transit. Then throw in an upgrade to 32GB of DDR5-6000 memory and you've got a rather sweet deal. The only real niggle is that SSD. Sure, 2TB of storage is great, but a PCIe Gen3 drive feels a bit old for such a premium machine. Don't forget the 'BFMonth' promo code to hit the price.

CyberPowerPC Gamer Infinity XLC | RTX 4080 | Core i9 13900K | 32GB RAM | 1TB SSD | $3,479 (opens in new tab)

CyberPowerPC Gamer Infinity XLC | RTX 4080 | Core i9 13900K | 32GB RAM | 1TB SSD | $3,479 $2,929 at CyberPowerPC (save $385) (opens in new tab)
The glorious-looking Hyte Y60 is the clothing around this high-powered RTX 4080-based machine. Alongside the latest Nvidia card is the most powerful gaming CPU around today in Intel's Raptor Lake Core i9, and 32GB of DDR5-6000 memory. That 1TB SSD is a full PCIe 4.0 option, too, so it's a proper speedy li'l drive. There's also a 1,000W PSU with a 16-pin power connector, so hopefully less chance of an adapter melting your rig...

Let's face it, however many times you scour the Black Friday graphics card deals (opens in new tab) list you're not going to suddenly find an Nvidia RTX 4090 (opens in new tab) on there with any kind of discount. Hell, you'd be lucky to find one in stock and sold for anything like its original MSRP.

But surprisingly there are Black Friday gaming PCs (opens in new tab) with RTX 40-series graphics cards baked into them going on sale with actual discounts. Of course, GPU pricing being what it is, these systems are in the ~$3,000 range, but at least then you're looking at bagging a modern Ada Lovelace graphics card at somewhere akin to its 'normal' MSRP.

The iBuyPower system up top is actually cheaper than some RTX 4090 cards we've spotted on sale at Newegg. Those prices are ridiculous, and if anyone pays even $2,000 for a GPU you don't get any sympathy from me. Still, even at the $1,600 MSRP you're talking about half the price of the full build already.

Along with that you get arguably the best gaming CPU on the market today, the Intel Core i9 13900K (opens in new tab) and a free upgrade to 32GB of DDR5-6000. Though it must be said that I'm not 100% sure how 'free' the upgrade is, but still it's a lot of very, very fast memory.

The issue I have with this rig, however, is that SSD. While a 2TB PCIe drive of any sort will deliver a healthy chunk of speedy storage, the Samsung 970 EVO is an old drive today, and you'd maybe hope for a PCIe 4.0 SSD for this sort of cash. But if that's the compromise you have to make, well, it'll do.

A word on the lead times, however. The iBuyPower machine states an estimated shipping date of December 15 at the time of writing, though does stipulate an extra week is added due to the in-demand nature of the new GPUs. Those GPUs are also shipped uninstalled, so you will need to do the plugging in yourself.

Nvidia RTX 4090 Founders Edition graphics card

(Image credit: Future)

That's actually the preferable option, if you ask me. These are massive lumps of silicon and aluminum heatsinks, and you don't want that coming dislodged during transit and trashing the rest of your new rig. It does provide PDF instructions on how to do it but really, it's just a matter of plugging in and screwing down.

If that's still too rich for your blood, we do have the RTX 4080-based options. Now, at its list price we struggle to recommend the Nvidia RTX 4080 (opens in new tab) as a worthy card on its own, but there are systems on offer for far less than RTX 3090-based machines that it will easily beat in a straight gaming frame rate race.

Origin Millennium | RTX 4080 | Core i7 13700K | 32GB RAM | 1TB SSD | $3,689 (opens in new tab)

Origin Millennium | RTX 4080 | Core i7 13700K | 32GB RAM | 1TB SSD | $3,689 $3,489 at Origin (save $200) (opens in new tab)
It's not a major saving, but you can score $200 off an Origin PC for Black Friday. The company is well-known for high-quality builds, even if they're not the cheapest, and this is no different. It's no doubt a super powerful PC, and you can get it delivered within 5–7 days if you need it sooner rather than later. You may have to configure it yourself to hit the same spec as us, so just note alongside the above we updated the PSU to a 1,000W model and bumped the SSD to the Samsung 980 Pro 1TB.

CyberPowerPC is presenting the Gamer Infinity XLC as $500 off right now. Which is only a couple hundred dollars below the iBuyPower system with the RTX 4090 inside it. That's a significantly better card, so if you can spare the extra $200 or so then that would be my recommendation. 

If you're on a strict $3,000 budget (lucky you, anyways) then this beautiful looking system will still see you right. There's no particular weak point in the build, and the delivery expectation is set for December 12. There's always going to be a fear that with the high demand of these cards that might shift, but CyberPowerPC does at least guarantee delivery "before Christmas or earlier."

Where can I buy RTX 40-series gaming PCs?

Dave has been gaming since the days of Zaxxon and Lady Bug on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race 2000!). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. He first started writing for Official PlayStation Magazine and Xbox World many decades ago, then moved onto PC Format full-time, then PC Gamer, TechRadar, and T3 among others. Now he's back, writing about the nightmarish graphics card market, CPUs with more cores than sense, gaming laptops hotter than the sun, and SSDs more capacious than a Cybertruck.