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Mass Effect 2 and 3 DLC bundles finally pop up on Origin

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Both Mass Effect 2 and 3 (opens in new tab) had some cracking DLC—the sneaky spy sequences of Kasumi's Stolen Memory and the rip-roaring Citadel (opens in new tab) are my two personal favourites. But they've been very difficult (and expensive) to get hold off, requiring you to mess around with clunky Bioware points rather than purchasing them outright. Things just got a bit easier, because DLC bundles for both games have just popped up on Origin.

Both packs contain all the major single and multi-player expansions, plus extra weapons, armour, digital art books, comics and soundtracks. The Mass Effect 3 bundle also comes with the extended cut of the game's controversial ending (opens in new tab), in case you didn't get to play through it the first time round.

The prices are slightly disappointing, if you ask me. The Mass Effect 2 bundle is $24.99/£21.99 (opens in new tab), while the third game's bundle is $29.99/£26.99 (opens in new tab). Now, if you break each one down, you'll see that you're making a decent saving compared to purchasing individual elements: Mass Effect 3's main single-player expansions, Citadel and Omega (opens in new tab), were $15 each, and for the same money here you're also picking up Leviathan (opens in new tab), From Ashes (opens in new tab), all the multiplayer add-ons and extra weapons. But considering the base games are available so cheap (both under $5), I'd have hoped the DLC would come in at a more bargain price.

Still, the fact that it's come to Origin means that, at some point, it will likely be on sale. I wouldn't surprise if it ends up on EA's subscription service Origin Access too, given that both base games are there (and so, remember, is Mass Effect: Andromeda (opens in new tab)). And if you missed the DLC the first time round and want a chance to join Commander Shepard once more, then this is a good opportunity. You're getting 10 hours+ of extra content from each bundle, and a lot of it is good.

Thanks to the eagle-eyed redditor (opens in new tab) that flagged it up.

Samuel Horti
Samuel Horti

Samuel Horti is a long-time freelance writer for PC Gamer based in the UK, who loves RPGs and making long lists of games he'll never have time to play. He's now a full-time reporter covering health at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. When he does have time for games you may find him on the floor, struggling under the weight of his Steam backlog.