Here's some more Austin Powers in Mass Effect, baby

Austin Powers expresses shock in a Mass Effect setting.
(Image credit: eli_handle_b)
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Sticking Austin Powers in Mass Effect (opens in new tab) is one of those ideas that I never knew I wanted until I'd seen it. In October last year the first of these videos appeared out-of-the-blue, putting the playboy and international man of mystery in Bioware's interstellar setting, and frankly it worked because the films are all about silly sex jokes that fit perfectly into Mass Effect's stilted romance conversations.

I still watch this every so often just for the Mako sequence, but the whole thing is amazing.

Now the original video has a sequel, and it's somehow just as good. The highlight here has to be the Geth Colossus sequence, but once again I'm left floored by just how well Austin Powers suits Mass Effect. There's something about all of Bioware's serious sci-fi characters playing it straight while he flounces around that almost makes me wish this was a full movie.

At the very least, if I ever return to these games I'm going to spend hours in the character creator trying to get Shepard as close to the swinging spy as I can.

Massive credit to the excellently named Eli_creator_b.wav (opens in new tab), whose various videogame mashups are executed with a technical skill and attention to detail that is uncommon: An hour spent on this channel is a good old time.

Oh and, if seeing Austin Powers in Mass Effect got you horny, why not invest in a Garrus body pillow.

Rich is a games journalist with 15 years' experience, beginning his career on Edge magazine before working for a wide range of outlets, including Ars Technica, Eurogamer, GamesRadar+, Gamespot, the Guardian, IGN, the New Statesman, Polygon, and Vice. He was the editor of Kotaku UK, the UK arm of Kotaku, for three years before joining PC Gamer. He is the author of a Brief History of Video Games, a full history of the medium, which the Midwest Book Review described as "[a] must-read for serious minded game historians and curious video game connoisseurs alike."