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Crossfire: Legion is a 'classic RTS' being developed by the makers of Homeworld 3

Crossfire: Legion
(Image credit: Blackbird Interactive)
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Crossfire is a popular competitive FPS in Asia, particularly in China and South Korea, but has only started to make inroads into Western markets relatively recently: Remedy is developing the singleplayer campaign for CrossfireX, although that unfortunately still hasn't been confirmed for PC. 

One new addition to the series that is definitely coming our way, however, is Crossfire: Legion, a brand-new RTS being developed by Homeworld 3 studio Blackbird Interactive.

A strategy take on the shooter series is something of a surprise, but it's a good fit for Blackbird, which was founded by former members of Homeworld studio Relic Entertainment. The studio's first release was the outstanding 2015 RTS Homeworld: Deserts of Kharak, and more recently it created the very promising outer-space scrap metal sim Hardspace: Shipbreaker (opens in new tab).

"Crossfire, being introduced in various platforms and genres, is growing into a world-class IP, and it is now reimagined as RTS," said Ina Jang, CEO of original Crossfire developer and publisher Smilegate Entertainment. "Crossfire: Legion is not only for the gamers who have previously enjoyed the original Crossfire, but also appeals to any gamer that wants to experience a classic RTS experiences reinvented in a modern time."

Crossfire: Legion will be published by Koch Media's new Prime Matter (opens in new tab) label, and is expected to be out sometime in 2022. There's not much to see just yet, but you can take a look at a couple of screens below.

Andy Chalk
Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.