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Chris Taylor cancels Wildman Kickstarter with four days and $600K to go

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With over half a million dollars left to raise and only a few days remaining, Gas Powered Games founder Chris Taylor has canceled the Wildman Kickstarter campaign (opens in new tab) . Taylor didn't say what will happen to the hybrid RPG/RTS (opens in new tab) or Gas Powered Games, just that it makes sense to focus attention on "other ways" to keep the studio running.

"We are profoundly grateful to those of you who backed this project and Gas Powered Games," continued Taylor in Wildman's final Kickstarter update. "Your passion and hard work put us in a position to write this exciting new chapter in the history of GPG."

A "substantial" number of Gas Powered Games employees were laid off (opens in new tab) shortly after the Kickstarter campaign launched, which Taylor explained was to mitigate their losses if the Kickstarter failed.

"If I ran this team through the entire Kickstarter campaign and it fails to fund, then I have to let everyone go, shut the company down," he said in an update video (opens in new tab) . "No one gets any unpaid PTO, or severance, or anything, and that's that. And that, I decided, was not worth it."

Last month, Taylor told PC Gamer (opens in new tab) that "the water is rising" in the old publisher model, and that abandoning it for Kickstarter was a necessary risk. "It wasn't like we choose A or B," he said. "The old model just wasn't working. It damn near was dead, to put it in so many words."

We can't say whether or not Taylor will be moving to the mountains (or worse), as he threatened in our interview (opens in new tab) , but we certainly hope not: we'd still very much like to try out Wildman.

Tyler grew up in Silicon Valley alongside Apple and Microsoft, playing games like Zork and Arkanoid on the early personal computers his parents brought home. He was later captivated by Myst, SimCity, Civilization, Command & Conquer, Bushido Blade (yeah, he had Bleem!), and all the shooters they call "boomer shooters" now. In 2006, Tyler wrote his first professional review of a videogame: Super Dragon Ball Z for the PS2. He thought it was OK. In 2011, he joined PC Gamer, and today he's focused on the site's news coverage. After work, he practices boxing and adds to his 1,200 hours in Rocket League.