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This real Far Cry 6 watch costs 1,200 real dollars

For outstanding contributions to the cause, Far Cry 6 heroine Dani Rojas was given a very special timepiece by revolutionary mastermind (and former Yaran spymaster) Juan Cortez: A watch awarded to him by Santos Espinosa, the previous president of Yara, for saving his life in 1983. The Khaki Field Titanium automatic not only keeps flawless time, it grants her a perk that reduces damage taken while sprinting. It's stylish, too!

Would you like a watch like that to wear in real life? Do you have $1,200 lying around? Is there absolutely nothing else that money would be better spent on than some ridiculous videogame tat? Then you, my friend, are going to want to take a look at the Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition from Hamilton, "identical in design to the in-game watch gear players can wear in Far Cry 6."

This snazzy chronograph features a 42mm titanium case, black face dial, and Hamilton's H-130 three-hand movement, featuring an 80-hour power reserve. The "6" on the dial is styled after the numeral in the Far Cry 6 logo, and a bright red second hand makes it easy to time your assault on the junta forces occupying the peninsula, or your Starbucks order, whatever the case may be. The limited-edition watch comes in special packaging with a replacement leather band, band changing tool, and leather carrying case, and only 1,983 are being made—a commemoration of the watch's history.

Give this bad boy an up-close look:

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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)
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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)
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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)
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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)
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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)
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Khaki Field Titanium Far Cry 6 Limited Edition

(Image credit: Hamilton)

Do note that the Hamilton watch, unlike the videogame equivalent, will not protect you from gunfire while you're running away from people trying to kill you. You know, just in case it ever comes up.

It's only fair to acknowledge that some watches are just really expensive: A nice Tag Heuer Formula 1 will set you back a couple grand very easily, for instance. What makes this particular timepiece so silly is the way that it's tied so tightly to game characters and lore that aren't likely to resonate with anyone, in any meaningful way, for any measurable length of time. Far Cry 6 will hopefully be a good shooter but the series isn't exactly renowned for its worldbuilding and storytelling. I thought the twist at the end of Far Cry 5 was very good, but I'll be damned if I can remember anybody's name.

Tag Heuer actually had a very expensive videogame tie-in of its own, releasing a Super Mario watch earlier this year that cost $2,150 and sold out in ten minutes—literally. But Mario is a deeply rooted pop culture icon who long ago transcended the boundaries of videogames; Dani Rojas, on the other hand, is the latest iteration of the anonymous Hawaiian shirt guy with a gun. I really don't see Hamilton's Far Cry 6 watch stirring up anything even approaching Mario-like levels of enthusiasm for expensive status symbols, especially when wristwatch aficionados can get exactly the same damn thing, minus the Far Cry trappings, for 250 bucks cheaper.

I will say this, though: On the spectrum of "overpriced nonsense you can wear in hopes of impressing someone," the $1,200 Far Cry 6 watch doesn't even come close to the $1,000 Fortnite shirt. At least the watch tells time—the shirt just tells you that it's time to seriously re-examine your priorities.

Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.