Build of the week: Bumblebee wall PC

It won't transform into a car, but it will transform your heart.

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Every Monday, Build of the Week highlights a unique rig from the web’s most dedicated PC building communities.  

Reddit user Marksmanguy doesn’t know what a bee looks like! It sure isn’t robotic and square and definitely doesn’t live on walls. No matter, he made a PC out of one, reassembling the bee’s constituent parts into something pretty powerful and worthy of the bee sacrifice.

But really, taking inspiration from Michael Bay’s Transformers movies, Marksmanguy put together a slick themed build with specs that’ll push most modern games to their limits. I’m a big advocate for open-faced PCs (and sandwiches) because they put the hardware on display—making a motherboard look good is no simple task—and because they encourage regular maintenance, just like a car. Only one without a sentient action movie robot living inside. If dust is gathering, it won’t just look bad, it’ll make you look bad. For Marksmanguy, that probably won’t ever be the case. He’s got one hell of a set up, complete with massive TV, a few monitors, and two other Autobot and Decepticon themed PCs to round out what is probably one of the best rooms on planet earth. Nice work.

For more information and pictures of the build process, check out the original thread on Reddit and Marksmanguy’s build log.

Bumblebee Wall PC components:

  • CPU: Intel i7 5820k
  • Mobo: ASRock Extended ATX DDR4 X99 OC FORMULA/3.1
  • GPU: EVGA Nvidia GTX 1080 Founders Edition
  • PSU: EVGA 1000P2
  • RAM: 4 x 8gb Corsair Vengeance DDR4 2666MHz LED
  • HDD: 2 x WD Black 2TB Performance
  • SSD: Samsung 850 PRO 512 GB SSD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

At only 11 years old, James took apart his parents’ computer and couldn’t figure out how to put it back together again. As an Associate Editor, he’s embarked on a dangerous quest to solve Video Games. Wish him luck.
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