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Intel eyeing up frame rate boosting tech for Intel Xe-HPG gaming GPUs

Intel fake GPU repeated on blue gradient
(Image credit: Future)
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Intel's very own Raja Koduri has said the company is interested in frame rate improving technology, such as AMD's FidelityFX Super Resolution (opens in new tab), to boost framerates on upcoming Intel Xe-HPG gaming graphics cards (opens in new tab).

Replying to Kyle Bennett, formerly of HardOCP, Koduri says Intel is "definitely looking at it [AMD FSR]", but also that Intel will explore open approaches to improving quality and performance with similar techniques.

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FidelityFX Super Resolution is AMD's answer to Nvidia DLSS (opens in new tab), or Deep Learning Super Sampling. At its core an upscaling technology, AMD has been cagey with the official details, so our current understanding is largely derived from a patent.

What we do know is AMD will be offering FSR open source and cross-vendor. That means it works on AMD's cards and Nvidia's. In fact, it should work on just about any graphics chip, which means not only is Intel happy to look into the solution, its Xe GPUs should be supported regardless.

Technicalities aside, AMD will release FidelityFX Super Resolution later this month, June 22, and it's looking for suggestions of which games to get it working on (opens in new tab).

As for Intel Xe-HPG graphics card, those are reportedly still on track to arrive later this year. Further tweets from Koduri (opens in new tab) suggest they're well on their way to final production—the latest a picture of Intel's DG2 GPU in a 512 EU configuration, which Koduri alludes has gone from "jittery journeys to buttery smooth".

Jacob Ridley
Jacob Ridley

Jacob earned his first byline writing for his own tech blog from his hometown in Wales in 2017. From there, he graduated to professionally breaking things as hardware writer at PCGamesN, where he would later win command of the kit cupboard as hardware editor. Nowadays, as senior hardware editor at PC Gamer, he spends his days reporting on the latest developments in the technology and gaming industry. When he's not writing about GPUs and CPUs, however, you'll find him trying to get as far away from the modern world as possible by wild camping.