This free open-source tool can help game developers make procedural ivy

There are plenty of tools to help game developers create environmental objects, like SpeedTree, which has famously been used to help make the trees in everything from The Witcher 3 to Assassin's Creed Origins. Game designer Robert Yang has just released a new open-source tool that can help developers create ivy and spread it over surfaces without having to do every inch by hand. It's called Hedera, and it's built on code originally written by Thomas Luft in 2006, which "strongly affirms the value of open source dev" as Yang put it on Twitter.

Hedera lets developers paint ivy onto 3D objects, "with detailed growth sim and proc gen mesh options", and comes with different presets for varying degrees of realistic or cartoonish ivy to suit any given game's style. Or you can just get in there and mess with the shaders and textures yourself.

This is a tool specifically for games being made in Unity, an engine which has been used to make plenty of games people don't associate with it—games like Hearthstone, Cities: Skylines, Wasteland 2, Beat Saber, and Cuphead, for instance, were all made in Unity.

Hedera can be downloaded here.