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Mass Effect's ten-year anniversary video teases a 'bright' future ahead

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Yesterday was November 7—N7 Day, in the parlance of Mass Effect fans, an occasion to celebrate all things about BioWare's hit sci-fi series. To mark the special day, BioWare released a "Ten Years of Mass Effect" video looking back on the history of the series and the things that made it special—and, despite the failure of Mass Effect: Andromeda to meet expectations, expressing hope for the future. 

The video features a number of BioWare mainstays, including the Shepard and Ryder voice actors, reminiscing on the making of the series, and the impact it's had on them personally and professionally. There are the requisite bits of trivia, like how the Vorcha voices were made and why the "SSV" designation for the Normandy was rejected. But while much of it feels like a eulogy, it's a line at the end that fans will want to hold onto.

"The future of Mass Effect, I think, is really bright. People just want to know more about this place, these characters," the narrator says. And then someone else takes over: "I think people keep coming back because it feels like home."   

It's an interesting way to wrap up, because it's an implicit rejection of the entire premise of Mass Effect: Andromeda, which was all about finding a new home. That attitude is evident throughout the video, in fact, in the way it very clearly focuses on the original trilogy despite coming in the same year as Andromeda's release. But the promise of a bright future, vague though it is, is encouraging. Andromeda may have flopped, but Mass Effect? Yeah, that's good stuff. 

Andy Chalk
Andy Chalk

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.