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Darkest Dungeon now has full mod support through the Steam Workshop

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Red Hook Studios said late last year that it was working on bringing official mod support to Darkest Dungeon, and today it delivered the goods. Steam Workshop support is now live, and there are already a good number of community-made mods to play with including new monsters and character classes, and a "large-scale reimagining" entitled Pitch Black Dungeon, which the studio described as similar to The Long War mod for XCOM. 

"We’ve always wanted to support mods for Darkest Dungeon, and going back to the Kickstarter, we listed it as a stretch goal. Though at the time we didn’t reach that level of funding, due to our success through Early Access, we decided to fully incorporate Steam Workshop after release," the studio wrote in a blog post. "Today marks the beginning of that support, and we cannot be more excited to see what our players come up with!" 

I can't vouch for their quality, but some of the more interesting-sounding mods currently in the Workshop include Fully Lit Darkness (opens in new tab), for players who need a break from the gloom, Descent Into Delerium (opens in new tab), which makes Stress management "easier, but much more of a threat" (no idea how that works), and the Moogle Mod (opens in new tab), which I'm including solely because it's cute. Red Hook said it will hold a community stream at 2 pm PT on April 7 on Twitch to showcase some of the mods and answer questions about modding. 

To mark the launch of Steam Workshop support, and the recent surpassing of the 1.25 million unit sales mark, Darkest Dungeon is on for half-price on Steam, taking it to $13/£10/€12 until April 11. 

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.