Skip to main content

Blizzard Esports mobile app features schedules, scores, and built-in Twitch linking

Audio player loading…

Blizzard has rolled out a new mobile esports app for Android and iOS devices called—wait for it—the Blizzard Esports Mobile App. The app provides schedules, news, and scores from Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, Overwatch, StarCraft, and World of Warcraft events from around the world, and will also serve up notifications of announcements and upcoming competitions.

The app is simple enough: When you first fire it up you'll select which games you want to follow, whether you want to show or hide scores (to avoid spoilers if you're not watching live), and whether you want to receive push notifications. After that, you'll be taken to the main screen, which has a dedicated news page, scores for past events and a schedule for upcoming matches, and information on Blizzard's various leagues. 

It's all very thorough, but my favorite part is the built-in Twitch linking. Any event that's being broadcast has a red "Live" tag on it; tap that and it slides you into the appropriate live feed on Twitch, just as smooth as that. 

The one knock against it is the actual name of the app: It's just "Esports," and I spent more time than I care to admit trying to figure out why the "B-for-Blizzard" app wasn't showing up on my damn phone. 

Blizzard said it plans to "expand the scope" of the app in the coming months and invited feedback from users about where they'd like to see it go from here, but I think it's pretty impressive already. If you follow any Blizzard esports, even casually, I suggest checking it out on Google Play or the App Store (opens in new tab).

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.