AMD’s updated price list suggests a phasing out of first generation Ryzen CPUs

You can still order first generation Ryzen processors from places like Amazon and Newegg, though for how long remains to be seen. AMD has removed several of its original Ryzen chips from its official price list, and if that means they've reached EOL (end of life) status as Guru3D surmises, then vendors will not have the option of restocking their inventories once their current stock runs dry.

There are half a dozen first generation Ryzen chips that are noticeably absent from AMD's updated price list. They include:

  • Ryzen 7 1800X
  • Ryzen 7 1700X
  • Ryzen 7 1700
  • Ryzen 5 1600X
  • Ryzen 5 1400
  • Ryzen 3 1200

That's not the full stack of first generation Ryzen hardware—the price list still has entries for the Ryzen 5 1600, Ryzen 5 1500X, and Ryzen 3 1300X, plus the company's Threadripper lineup.

So what does this ultimately mean? Not a whole lot, since AMD's second-gen Ryzen chips are compatible with all socket AM4 motherboards. And for anyone building a Ryzen system, we recommend taking a hard look at AMD's newer Ryzen parts, which offer faster clockspeeds and better overall performance with less headaches than what we saw when the first-gen Ryzen parts first arrived.

Something else to note is that with the advent of the Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G APUs, the 4-core Ryzen 3 and 5 CPUs are basically superfluous. In testing, the 2400G matched or beat the 1500X while costing less than the 1400, and the 2200G does the same for the 1300X at a lower price than the 1200.

That said, there could be some interesting deals to be had on first-gen parts as vendors look to clear space for newer hardware. We're already seeing this to some extent. For example, the Ryzen 7 1800X is selling for $319 on Amazon, versus around $330 for most of March and $350 in February and January.