The longest ever Hearthstone turn finally ends after 45 hours

Hearthstone Turn

Take a walk with me through the pantheon of human achievement. Here we have the moment mankind broke free of their Earthbound shackles, to reach out and touch the stars. Here we have the great discoveries of science and art and philosophy. Here we have the recording of Taylor Swift's Shake It Off.

And now, here, we come to a new entry: Hearthstone streamer 'Mamytwink' taking almost two days to beat himself at a game of Internet Wizard Cards.

Yes, a new world record for the longest ever Hearthstone turn has been set—the full turn finally clocking in at 1 day, 21 hours and 18 minutes.

I don't really understand Hearthstone, or maths, and so I'll let our Tom Marks explain just how this epic turn was engineered:

"In Hearthstone, each turn is usually limited to a minute and a half long. If a card’s animation is still running, however, it will remain on that player’s turn until the animation is complete. The player, Mamytwink, exploited this concept to its fullest potential through some cardsharing trickery. He filled the hand of one player with nine copies of a card called Arcane Missiles that deals three damage by firing three slow moving missiles, and then used 206 copies of a card called Velen’s Chosen which increases spell damage by one, increasing the number of missiles fired. Finally, he filled the board with seven copies of a minion called Prophet Velen that doubles spell damage, doubling the 209 missiles the Arcane Missiles card would fire seven times, and causing each card to shoot not three missiles, but 26,752 missiles. One at a time. For 40 hours.

"All that was left was to play all nine Arcane Missiles cards at once, which will activate one at a time, and have the enemy play a card called Ice Block that keeps them from dying until the next turn. Approximately 240,000 missiles and 40 hours later the turn will end, the player who’d just been pummeled for two days straight will die to fatigue damage. GG."

You can watch the rewatch the entire stream, but to be honest, I'd advise against it. Instead, see below for the set up, or head to Mamytwink's stream, where he's currently replaying the final moments.


Phil has been PC gaming since the '90s, when RPGs had dice rolls and open world adventures were weird and French. Now he's the deputy editor of PC Gamer; commissioning features, filling magazine pages, and knowing where the apostrophe goes in '90s. He plays Scout in TF2, and isn't even ashamed.
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