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Fallout 76's nuke codes have been hotfixed

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Update: Bethesda took Fallout 76 down for a bit today to hotfix the 'no-nukes' issue we reported below. The servers are now back online and players are busy solving the new launch codes.

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Original story: Fallout 76 (opens in new tab) had an unexpectedly peaceful New Year’s Day when players discovered the first major bug of 2019: nuke codes were broken. Survivors searching for nuke codes in the wasteland on January 1 discovered they hadn't been reset, giving the post-apocalyptic West Virginia a respite from the nuclear attacks. 

Disabling nukes as a sort of New Year’s armistice sounds like a nice way to kick off 2019, but this wasn’t a planned event or a surprise from Bethesda. It’s just another unanticipated issue. Very much a regular day in Fallout 76, then. 

Bethesda confirmed it wasn’t a scheduled event on Twitter (opens in new tab) yesterday, but there’s been no official update since. A community manager did say that a hotfix should be expected today (opens in new tab), however.

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It’s a rough start to 2019 for Fallout 76, which didn’t have a great 2018, either. On the other hand, maybe it’s a good thing? Nukes are, and I know I’m being controversial here, quite bad. Will they really be missed? Maybe this could be the start of a new era of peaceful cooperation for the denizens of the wasteland.  

Cheers, GamesRadar (opens in new tab).

Fraser Brown
Online Editor

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.