Nvidia

Nvidia man says PCs are "superior to any console" for gaming, Earth continues to orbit Sun

Phil Savage at

In case you hadn't noticed, this site is called PC Gamer. As you might expect from that title, we're pretty keen on PC games and the PCs that play them. So when an employee of Nvidia says something to the effect of "the PC platform is far superior to any console when it comes to gaming," part of me thinks, "well yes, obviously it is." Of course, part of me also thinks, "well yes, you would say that, because your competitor is making graphics chips for both next-gen consoles."


Go small or go home - Nvidia looks to push the Art of Gaming mini-PCs

Dave James at

As the world and their virtual wives get all giddy about a couple of new AMD-based mini-PCs from Sony and Microsoft, Nvidia has set themselves up to compete with the new console generation for the Christmas holidays. In partnership with a bunch of system building folk Nvidia wants to push small form factor gaming PCs, with serious graphics power, into the mainstream. It's called the Art of Gaming.

DinoPC’s Mini Ultimate is one such system and, while the £1,500 sticker price is more expensive than three new consoles together, it’s a mighty fine gaming rig for the money. This is a seriously high-end machine in a snug little chassis.


GTX 780 and 770 get price drop in wake of AMD 290X release, 780 Ti gets release date

Tom Senior at

You could fry an egg on AMD's Radeon R9 290X chip and it gobbles up power like a volt-starved Pikachu, but its speedy performance has forced Nvidia's hand - find out why in our 290X review. AnandTech report that they're dropping the price of the GTX 780 by $150 to $500, and the price of the 770 by $70 to $330. The former just undercuts AMD's new flagship GPU, and the latter puts the 770 in a competitive range with the AMD 280X.


Nvidia Shield update adds official PC streaming, console mode, more Android support

Patrick Carlson at

With the Nvidia Shield's PC streaming function now out of its beta phase, the handheld's latest update should bring more flexibility to an already innovative device. The machine's new patch also introduces a new console mode and increased gamepad support for touch-screen games, alongside Android 4.3, according to a press release today.


Nvidia Shield review

Logan Decker at

Everybody knows that if you try to get a cat to do what you want—sit up, fetch a stick, search for explosives—it will do nothing more than stare at you with contempt. That’s why console pitches to PC gamers tend to fall flat: we’re generally not as interested in hearing how a bunch of suits want us to play our games. Nvidia took a much different approach with the Shield, on the other hand, that seems to account for what PC gamers have in common with cats: give us great hardware and the freedom to do whatever we feel like doing, and we’ll show ourselves a great time.


Nvidia GTX 780 Ti: what do we expect to see?

Dave James at

Nvidia announced they’re hoping to spoil the AMD party by dropping a bomb on the gathered press out in Montreal last week: the GeForce GTX 780 Ti. If the rumours are true and the incoming AMD Radeon R9-290X can beat a GTX Titan in a stand up gaming fight then Nvidia are going to need some sort of riposte. But what exactly?


AMD have repeatedly assured the public the brand new Radeon R9-290X is going to be released this month and there’s not a long time left in October. That’s coming soon and I don’t reckon the new GTX 780 Ti is going to be far behind.

Nvidia unveils GeForce GTX 780 Ti

Tyler Wilde at

Nvidia is making big announcements in Montreal today. We've got G-Sync, which flips the V-sync idea on its head and synchronizes monitor refresh rates to GPU output; recording and Twitch streaming features coming to GeForce Experience; and finally, the hardware: the GeForce GTX 780 Ti.


Nvidia's GeForce Experience to record gameplay, offer one-click streaming via Twitch

Perry Vandell at

During an Nvidia event held today, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang discussed a new feature that’ll supposedly make your amazing, video game-related exploits all the more believable to your dubious friends: ShadowPlay.


Goodbye, V-sync! Nvidia G-Sync synchronizes monitor refresh rates with GPU render rates

Tyler Wilde at

The standard display refresh rate is 60Hz—that's 60 images per second—but fancy GPUs can render way more than 60 frames per second. We like more frames. More frames means more responsive input—and screw compromise!—but when out-of-sync rendering traps multiple frames in a single refresh, the Horrible One emerges: screen tearing. The best we can do now is tame the beast with V-sync, but in Montreal today, Nvidia unsheathed a new weapon which it claims will put tearing and stuttering down for good.


Valve says commercial Steam Machines will support AMD, Intel, and Nvidia graphics hardware

Patrick Carlson at

Even as Valve is trying to ease access to PC gaming in the living room, its plans for the Steam Machine won't be held up by an adherence to a single manufacturer of graphics hardware. The proposed SteamOS-based systems will support a variety of graphics builds with GPUs from AMD, Intel, and Nvidia when they launch next year, according to a report at Maximum PC.


Call of Duty: Ghosts system requirements posted by Nvidia

Michael Jones at

Update: Well, that didn't take long. Activision's support Twitter account has just confirmed that these specs are not official. Original story follows inside.

While it's not official, the likely PC requirements for Call of Duty: Ghosts have been posted on Nvidia's website. The minimum requirements are pretty friendly to those without giant rigs, but a slight step up from previous CoDs given the transition to new console hardware.

Nvidia VP: "There's no way a 200-watt Xbox is going to beat a 1,000-watt PC"

Ian Birnbaum at

Nvidia is suddenly all over the news this week, announcing that it's working with the new SteamOS and boasting about how much more powerful PCs are than consoles. Given that Nvidia was skipped over for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4, it's understandable that it wants PC gamers to know it loves us very, very much.


Nvidia pledge to help Linux's open source driver community

Phil Savage at

This week, it seems, everything is coming up Linux. First Valve announce their own Linux-based OS, and now, Nvidia are making moves to get more involved with the open source community. Nvidia's Andy Ritger contacted the developers of Nouveau - an open source, reverse-engineered version of Nvidia's proprietary drivers - offering information on the workings of their GPUs.


Watch Dogs PC version getting some Nvidia treats

Perry Vandell at

Nvidia wrote a little blog post announcing Nvidia and Ubisoft have joined forces to pretty up the PC versions of a few upcoming titles, including the surveillance pipe dream known as Watch Dogs.


Nvidia CloudLight: using cloud computing to deliver faster lighting

Dave James at

Remember Microsoft making some noises about the Xbox One’s cloud-rendering power? To somewhat offset the fact they’re jamming a weaker GPU into their gaming slab than Sony is with the PlayStation 4, Microsoft is employing 300,000 servers to bolster processing of “latency-insensitive computation”. And now Nvidia has just announced CloudLight, something which sounds more than a little bit similar.

Nvidia released a technical report on CloudLight on their website outlining what it could mean for games. They call it a system “for computing indirect lighting in the Cloud to support real-time rendering for interactive 3D applications on a user’s local device.” In practice, this means Nvidia can use GeForce GRID servers to compute a game engine's global illumination to ease the load on your gaming device of choice.


EVGA GeForce GTX 760 Superclocked review

Dave James at

Nvidia upped the clocks on its cut down GK 104 and EVGA decided to go one better with the GTX 760 Superclocked. But with the reference card’s GPU already hauling as much gaming load as its silicon can handle, is there any point in a more expensive overclocked version?

We’ve already seen the standard Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 today, and there will likely be many reference versions hitting the shelves as I type, but there will also be a slew of these factory-overclocked cards. Is it worth the extra cost? Let's find out.


Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 review

Dave James at

Component manufacturers love the bombastic use of military speak and the double whammy of GTX 700 series releases from Nvidia certainly have something of the shock-and-awe about them. This latest card, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 is no different, and sets to the middle order of AMD’s competing Radeon graphics cards.

It’s rare though that Nvidia and AMD don’t decide to launch their new graphics generations - whether they’re whole new architectures or range refreshers - at around the same time. Generally there’s only a few months between them at worst, with Nvidia normally the ones turning up late to the party, blaming the traffic on the way over or difficulties in hitting decent yields with new process nodes.

This time though it’s Nvidia who are the first to arrive, eagerly clutching their new silicon, with AMD kicking their heels back in Texas. But this apparently is not a delay, AMD have decided they are going to stick with their current range of HD 7000 GPUs until the end of the year, so confident are they in their existing cards. I’ve got to believe though somewhere there are some AMD Radeon execs who are sweating just a little more now.


How AMD's hardware in next-gen consoles will affect PC gamers

Dave James at

We’ve known AMD are the go-to guys for next-gen console silicon for a good while now. The tech press has been speculating since the consoles’ specs were first announced as to how the PC could benefit from Sony and Microsoft opting for the x86, and specifically AMD, architecture. After all the Xbox 360 was running AMD graphics hardware and, from my perspective, the benefits to the PC from that relationship are pretty intangible at best. There are signs that things may be different this time around.

"The consoles are really the target for a lot of the game developers, if it’s a Radeon heart powering that console, like the PS4 or Xbox 360, that means these games devs are going to be designing their games, designing their features and really optimising for that Radeon heart" said AMD's Devon Nekechuk around the launch of the Radeon HD 7990. But why, specifically, will that be the case? I asked AMD's worldwide manager of ISV gaming engineering, Nicolas Thibieroz for the nitty gritty.


Nvidia heralds PC as the "best gaming experience" in E3 press conference

Ian Birnbaum at

Nvidia did some well-deserved strutting at E3 yesterday, showing off the superiority of the PC as a gaming platform. With charts and graphs and maybe just a teeny tiny hint of bitterness that AMD processors are powering both the PS4 and the Xbox One, Nvidia’s Tony Tamasi told the room that “the PC is the most powerful gaming platform out there.”


E3 2013: The impact on the PC

PC Gamer at

The new consoles have the spotlight at E3 2013 this year, but what will the expo's many reveals, demos, hardware rollouts, and buzzwords mean for the PC? Is this even a show for us at all, with the focus on the brick and mortar retail market? We discuss the implications, and speculate on which of the big, all-star console titles will eventually make it to our corner of the gaming universe.