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Windows 10 is already the third most popular OS on Steam

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Steam Hardware Survey

Windows 10 has been out for a little over a month, and yet it's already the third-most popular operating system on Steam. The Steam Hardware and Software Survey for August 2015 reveals that more than 16 percent of Steam users are now running the 64-bit version of Windows 10, putting it well ahead of Windows 8, Windows Vista, and even the original Windows 7.

Windows 10 usage now trails just Windows 8.1 64-bit, which accounts for 23.36 percent of users, and Windows 7 64-bit, still the top dog with 39.71 percent. But they're both in decline, losing 7.6 percent and 5.26 percent of their bases respectively, while Windows 10 adoption leaped by an impressive 13.17 percent over the past month. The 32-bit version of Windows 10 is actually on the board too, at a relatively minuscule 0.63 percent, which is still enough to put it ahead of Windows Vista (both editions) and the 32-bit releases of Windows 8 and 8.1.

At this rate, Windows 10 will likely take second place from Windows 8.1 in the next survey, or October at the latest. Windows 7 will surely take longer, but maybe not as long as it might initially appear. Windows 8 was a botch job, but Windows 10 appears to be not just stable but actually pretty good. There have been some bumps, of course, but generally speaking they've been the sort of thing you'd expect from a new OS rather than legitimate deal-breakers. I'm still a Windows 7 user and I expected to remain so for a long time, but the more I read, the more I think that Windows 10 might be worth a shot sooner rather than later.

Thanks, VentureBeat.

Andy has been gaming on PCs from the very beginning, starting as a youngster with text adventures and primitive action games on a cassette-based TRS80. From there he graduated to the glory days of Sierra Online adventures and Microprose sims, ran a local BBS, learned how to build PCs, and developed a longstanding love of RPGs, immersive sims, and shooters. He began writing videogame news in 2007 for The Escapist and somehow managed to avoid getting fired until 2014, when he joined the storied ranks of PC Gamer. He covers all aspects of the industry, from new game announcements and patch notes to legal disputes, Twitch beefs, esports, and Henry Cavill. Lots of Henry Cavill.