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Every Cyberpunk 2077 player gets 'exactly the same in-game content'

Cyberpunk 2077
(Image credit: CD Projekt RED)
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Cyberpunk 2077 (opens in new tab) comes in a few different flavours, including a collector's edition and a preorder edition, both containing lots of extras. None of them, however, give you anything you can use when you start wandering around Night City. When asked about it on Twitter, CD Projekt Red explained that in-game bonuses were specifically committed.

"No, we don't do that," the Cyberpunk 2077 Twitter account said. "Every person that buys the game gets exactly the same in-game content, no matter if they buy it in preorders, on release date or 2 years later." The exchange was posted on Reddit (opens in new tab)

Slapping down some cash before it launches won't net you a sweet new jacket for V, then, but it also suggests that there won't be special editions that throw in extra gear or missions down the line. We know that there will be DLC and possibly expansions, however, though expect the former to be free. 

CD Projekt Red took a similar approach with The Witcher 3, releasing lots of DLC, complete with new missions, for all players. Only the meaty expansions were sold, which could be bought separately, with the expansion pass and, later, bundled together in the Game of the Year Edition. 

Preorder bonuses are pretty par for the course and never really worth the risk of buying a game before it's out, but at least this time you can wait and not worry about missing out on a mission or a cool skin for your gun. 

I've reached out to CD Projekt Red to confirm if this is the developer's official stance, and what that means for possible future editions. 

Cheers, Twisted Voxel (opens in new tab).

Fraser is the UK online editor and has actually met The Internet in person. With over a decade of experience, he's been around the block a few times, serving as a freelancer, news editor and prolific reviewer. Strategy games have been a 30-year-long obsession, from tiny RTSs to sprawling political sims, and he never turns down the chance to rave about Total War or Crusader Kings. He's also been known to set up shop in the latest MMO and likes to wind down with an endlessly deep, systemic RPG. These days, when he's not editing, he can usually be found writing features that are 1,000 words too long or talking about his dog.