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Crypt of the Necrodancer trailer dances to the beat of a Steam Early Access release

Phil Savage at

I can't imagine a combination of words more targeted to my interests than "rhythm roguelike". Maybe "chicken ice cream", but that would be disgusting. Crypt of the Necrodancer, however, is a sublime game—tying turn-based dungeon crawling to the beat of a Danny Baranowsky soundtrack. Even better, it will be available at the end of the month, with the Early Access version launching on 30 July.


Listen to Bioware's GaymerX panels on romance and inclusiveness

Phil Savage at

The second GaymerX—the LGBTQ-oriented gaming convention—took place last weekend. In addition to workshops, parties and more Pokemon-themed competitions than you would think possible, the event also featured a number of guest speakers. Among them, Bioware's David Gaider, Jessica Merizan, Robyn Théberge, Karin Weekes and Patrick Weekes—who participated in two panels: "Building a Better Romance" and "Freaking out the Neighbours". Bioware have now uploaded the audio from both talks to YouTube.


Pixel Boost: No One Lives Forever 2 at 1440p

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month, Pixel Boost guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: Cate Archer lives forever (in our hearts).

It's been 12 years since the PC hosted the adventures of 1960s superspy Cate Archer. Twelve years too long. If you've played NOLF or its sequel, No One Lives Forever 2: A Spy in H.A.R.M.'s Way, you know why they're some of the best shooters of all time: smart AI, inventive weaponry, and an endlessly witty script. They were also some of the best-looking games of the early 2000s, which means they hold up remarkably well today--with a little tinkering to add widescreen support and higher resolutions. While the rights to the NOLF games have been lost to legal limbo for years, a trademark filing back in May could hint that they'll finally show up on Steam or GOG in the future. For now, the only way to play them is to load up a trusty old CD copy. If you've got one, it's time to Pixel Boost.

Unturned review (Early Access)

Andy Kelly at

Unturned is a DayZ-style survival sim with a Minecraft-inspired art style. I don’t blame you if you’ve already tuned out. PC is awash with DayZ and Minecraft clones. But Unturned is notable in that it’s currently the fourth most-played game on Steam, beating Football Manager, Skyrim, and Garry’s Mod by many thousands of players—and it was developed by a sixteen year-old. It’s an amazing story—the kind only possible on PC—but is the game itself actually any good?


The International 2014: everything you need to know before the main event

Chris Thursten at

After an eventful group stage, the International begins in earnest tomorrow. Of the nineteen teams in contention for the Aegis of Champions on the 8th of July, eight remain. Over four days at Seattle's KeyArena, those eight teams will fight to secure the lion's share of the largest prize pool in competitive gaming history. The winner will take away just shy of $5m. But this extraordinary reward, most players will tell you, isn't the point. The International is Dota 2's alpha and omega: it is where reputations are made, where teams are proven. Many of the matchups you watch this weekend will never come about in the same way again; the stress of falling short at The International is enough to tear lineups apart and force teams to start over. This is the end of the biggest year in the game's life and the beginning of the next.


Hearthstone Help: Tips for overcoming Ladder anxiety

Tim Clark at

Often, before I begin a Hearthstone Ladder session, my stomach starts churning and my heartbeat races. I actually feel the same sort of nerves you might get before an exam. Or a date. Back when I used to do either of those things. And because what, I might lose a couple of ranks in one night? Who cares? Well, dumb though it is, I do care. I’ve got the Ladder yips, and I want to overcome them...


This SSD plugs into a spare PCIe slot, but is it faster?

Dave James at

That thing in the above picture is an SSD, and a hoofing big one too. The Plextor M6e is the first M.2 SSD I’ve had arrive in the office, and it’s a 512GB drive that aims to circumvent the limitations of current SATA connections by using the same PCI Express bus that's been providing oodles of bandwidth to graphics cards for years.


NeoTokyo video: max settings at 2560x1440 on LPC

PC Gamer at

NeoTokyo, the Half-Life 2-mod-turned-full-game, may be running on the old horse that is the Source engine, but it still sports some lovely cyberpunk skylines. It also shows that we can throw the Large Pixel Collider, our inconceivably beefy gaming rig, onto the back of that old horse and squeeze out every bit of cyberpunk goodness we can get at 2560x1440 and ultra settings.

The 15 best Arma 3 player-created solo missions

Andy Kelly at

The Arma series is famous for its massive multiplayer battles, but there’s still fun to be had on the war-torn islands of Stratis and Altis by yourself. These missions can all be played solo, with a focus on small squads, infantry, or infiltration. They’ve all been created by Arma players using the game’s powerful built-in editing tools, and some are as impressive as anything in Bohemia’s own campaign.


You have one day to grab a free Steam key for Really Big Sky

PC Gamer at

As you'll note from the screenshot above, Really Big Sky has an exciting ratio of exploding space to non-exploding space. As a roaming spaceship, you spray globs of super-heated plasma like a brachiosaurus trapped in an infinite sneeze, dousing the enemies of man in neon spew until they explode. It's a fast-paced, twin-stick arcade shooter with procedurally generated levels that occasionally lets you drill through entire planets to pick up powerups lodged in their mantle. Fancy getting the whole game for free? You have just under twenty-four hours, captain. Grab your key here.


Clever chemistry puzzler Sokobond comes to Steam next week

Phil Savage at

Sokobond is coming to Steam. I know this because I've just watched a video called "Did you know? Sokobond is coming to Steam on July 21st", (the answer to that question being, "I do now"). If you like the sound of chemistry-based, molecule-pushing puzzling, you don't have to sit at the Steam page, waiting for that date to arrive. Sokobond can be bought directly from its creators, and all who purchase will receive a Steam key after it's launched on Valve's service next week.


Battlefield 4: Dragon's Teeth trailer shows explosive action, jet-ski escapes

Phil Savage at

I've been falling down an Arma hole recently, and so my initial reaction to this video was one of alarm. Driving tanks into the path of an oncoming train? Absconding with a flag while riding a jet-ski? Running willy-nilly into the incoming fire of your enemies? Riding a digger?! That's not how you do a war. Of course, that's also not the point. The point: to be a loud and explosive playground filled with destructive possibility. If this trailer's two minutes of action are anything to go by, the Dragon's Teeth DLC could be a success in that regard.


4K Screenshot Showcase: Elite: Dangerous

Ben Griffin at

Every week, keen screen-grabber Ben Griffin brings you a sumptuous 4K resolution gallery to celebrate PC gaming's prettiest places.

With 400 billion stars across 100 billion star systems, there's almost endless variety in Elite's 1:1 scale Milky Way. Planets range from bright pink gas giants to asteroid-belted hunks of rock, while cosmic phenomena include pulsars, comets and black holes (although I've personally never seen those last three because space is quite large). Space stations are my favorite, looking like tiny floating jewels until you get close and see them for the mammoth, rapidly rotating constructs they are. If you're in the premium beta, make sure to pay a visit to the Orbis Starport in the Aulin System - it looks like something out of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Saturday Crapshoot: The Palace Of Deceit

Richard Cobbett at

Every week, Richard Cobbett rolls the dice to bring you an obscure slice of gaming history, from lost gems to weapons grade atrocities. This week, as Cliff Bleszinski unveils his latest game plans, it's time for a quick round of Before They Were Famous. What happened before the 'overnight' success?

Of course, there's almost never any such thing - almost all success coming from much hard work, effort, a little bit of luck, and often less celebrated success. I for instance have been working on death rays for years, yet still write a weekly column on obscure games rather than composing lists of demands to world leaders. Game developers meanwhile often start with, unsurprisingly, games. They may not be great to begin with, they may have the spark of genius right from the very start, or be somewhere in the middle. All that matters is that when you dare to dream, you never know what might come next. Unless you're talking about the game Dare To Dream, in which case it's probably something really, really goofy.

But we'll get to that one soon enough. First, there's a much more obscure adventure to check out.

The PC Gamer Show episode 1: Killing Floor 2, Nidhogg, 4K gaming

PC Gamer at

It's The PC Gamer Show! For episode one, we talked to Tripwire Interactive about upcoming shooter Killing Floor 2, played a high stakes game of Nidhogg with serious embarrassment on the line, and got our hands on a new Samsung 4K monitor.


Divinity: Original Sin review

Chris Thursten at

Blood conducts electricity. Of course it does. My supposedly single-target lightning spell arcs from mage to skeleton and on to the ground, where it touches the splattered byproduct of the ongoing melee. From there it reaches my rogue, my warrior, my archer. My entire party is electrocuted in a single moment's miscalculation, and I learn another hard lesson about Divinity: Original Sin's commitment to its own brand of realism.


Steelseries talk mouse design, sensors, weight and the wireless future

Wes Fenlon at

A good mouse is instantly forgotten. Whether you prefer a finger-grip or a flat-palm stance, once you've found a good mouse it seems to vanish from consideration the moment you touch it. It's just an extension of your will. A lot of work goes into the design and construction of the modern mouse to achieve this effect, so we asked Steelseries' chief technical officer, Tino Soelberg, what constructors consider when creating new designs, and to speculate a little on the future of these vital peripherals.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

Phil Savage at

Every Friday, the PC Gamer team pile into the war room to fight over the best and worst of the last seven day's in gaming. Up first, the best bits. Read them quick, before the bombs fall...

Is silicon doomed? IBM invests billions in quest to find alternative

Dave James at

The days of silicon sitting inside our CPUs and GPUs are numbered, according to a recent announcement by chip giant, IBM. They’re betting a cool $3 billion dollars on being able to find a decent alternative before silicon starts to hinder hardware progress.


Shattered Planet review

Richard Cobbett at

What’s a roguelike? It’s getting harder to find an answer these days, with more and more games taking the basic idea of randomly generated worlds and adding enough of a spin that a single pseudo-genre can’t really cover it. Shattered Planet features most of the tropes, including randomised worlds full of painful death. You play as a series of disposable clones, sent down from a spaceship to Planet Hey, Isn’t This Bastion? to document wildlife and hunt for treasure on behalf of an occasionally generous employer. Where most roguelikes treat each life as a fresh, all-inclusive experience, here the currency found on each jaunt can be spent on permanent character upgrades. Does that disqualify it? Who knows. But it certainly helps when facing an army of killer aliens for the fiftieth time.