Feature

Oculus Connect interview: Lucky's Tale developers on finding the "Mario brick" for VR platformers

Wes Fenlon at

Before I tried on the Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype, the best VR experience I'd had was playing platformer Lucky's Tale back at E3. The charming platformer works amazingly well in virtual reality, and I was eager to talk to Playful Studios CEO Paul Bettner about how the game has progressed since E3, and what he thought of the new prototype hardware. I ended up talking to Bettner and Lucky's Tale director Dan Hurd about redefining the 3D platformer in virtual reality, the importance of positional audio, and how much more challenging level design can be in VR.

Also, Bettner gave me a rough window for Lucky's Tale release. He plans to have the game out in the first half of 2015, before the release of the consumer Oculus Rift. Check out the full interview below.


Sims 4 Diaries: The Odd Couple

Andy Kelly at

Meet George and Dave. George is ambitious, obsessively tidy, and good-natured. Dave is lazy, messy, and mean-spirited. Together, they are the Odd Couple.


Oculus Crescent Bay interview: Nate Mitchell on prototype tech and VR presence

Wes Fenlon at

After testing out Oculus VR's new headset prototype Crescent Bay, I put the pieces of my brain back together enough to have a coherent chat with Nate Mitchell, VP of product at Oculus. I last talked to Nate at E3, when he walked me through demos of SUPERHOT and Lucky's Tale. This time, at Oculus Connect, we talked about the new Crescent Bay prototype—what Oculus had to improve from DK2 to achieve "presence," what kind of hardware it takes to run games at 90Hz, and whether gamers who ordered a DK2 should be upset that there's already a new prototype on the way.

What to expect from Ground Zeroes, Metal Gear Solid 5's experimental prelude

Samuel Roberts at

Here’s something I never thought I’d get to write about in PC Gamer. Metal Gear Solid 5 is coming to PC. First, prelude/enhanced demo Ground Zeroes will arrive on Steam, followed in 2015, hopefully simultaneously with the console releases, by the full game with the striking subtitle of The Phantom Pain.


League of Legends World Championships Week One: the best moments, the biggest plays

PC Gamer at

The first week of the League of Legends World Championships 2014 has come to a dramatic conclusion, and has been a good tournament so far for both LoL fans, and anyone who enjoys expert e-sports and upsets. It's not easy to boil down four days of elite LoL play into six bullet points, but this way you get to watch the series' most thrilling moments, back-to-back. Get your videos and analysis right here.


Dawn of War retrospective: ten years of war in the 41st millennium

Tom Senior at

The Wraithlord is a twelve-foot tall monster crafted from psychic bone, imbued with the spirit of an ancient warrior who exists to only to kill. The Space Marine Captain is the champion of a barely-human warrior caste who runs around in power armour that compounds his ridiculous strength. When these two meet on a battlefield, something messy and exciting ought to happen.


Nvidia's Dynamic Super Resolution is downsampling made easy

Wes Fenlon at

Back in April, Dark Souls modder Durante revealed a new tool he'd written called GeDoSaTo, or Generic Downsampling Tool. Downsampling is like the ultimate brute force anti-aliasing solution--it involves running a game at a high resolution, like 1440p or 4K or even 8K--and then using an algorithm to rescale that image to your monitor's native, like 1080p. Downsampled games look amazingly sharp, but downsampling usually requires some tricky hacks, like adjusting monitor timings or modifying game files. GeDoSaTo made it possible to downsample games more easily than ever before, but it's still a mod tool, and all mod tools require trial and error and tinkering.

Well, Nvidia's been paying attention. One of the major features coming to Maxwell GPUs like the GTX 980 is called Dynamic Super Resolution—and it's just downsampling, but with official driver support instead of hacking. The favorite technique of hardcore PC screenshotters is coming to the masses.


Three Lane Highway: exploring the expensive e-sports hype trailers of tomorrow

Chris Thursten at

Three Lane Highway is Chris' weekly column about Dota 2.

Today I watched a very dramatic and slick and expensive-looking trailer for League of Legends' Worlds 2014 tournament. I thought about it in relation to the game of my own preference, and how I spent part of July in a basketball stadium getting really worked up about international wizard conflict. I've written about the narratives that surround the rise of e-sports before. Today, for these reasons and despite many others, I felt compelled to do so in the form of a science fiction press release.

Sims 4 Diaries: The Cube of Despair

Andy Kelly at

Witness Mr. Henry Sim, a sour little man in a self-imposed exile from the world. He shirks the warmth of others, living a lonely existence of reality television, microwave dinners, and bitter resentment of the people who smile and laugh around him. But in just a moment, Mr. Sim will enter a world without happiness or laughter. He’ll have a world all to himself, without anyone, in the Cube of Despair.


Mod of the Week: Pilgrimage, for Arma 3

Phil Savage at

Our regular mod wrangler Chris Livingston is indisposed this week—likely pruning back his INIs, and exorcising rogue RARs. Normal service will resume next week. Before that, I'd like to step in to highlight Pilgrimage, an Arma 3 scenario that, judging from the response to Andy's showcase of the game's best solo missions, is a clear community favourite.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

Tim Clark at

Each week PC Gamer’s writers are submerged in amniotic fluid until their combined brainpower produces the exact ratio of words-to-opinion required to accurately describe the past seven days. Enjoy!


Interview with a Hearthstone botter: "I'm not scared of getting caught"

Tim Clark at

We meet one of the men behind the bots plaguing Hearthstone. He tells us about using it in Arena, beating famous streamers, unlimited gold, and why he's not worried about Blizzard's "scare tactics".


Three Lane Highway: what tournament play has taught me about Dota 2

Chris Thursten at

Three Lane Highway is Chris' column about Dota 2.

You're always learning, whether or not it feels like it. I've had games of Dota where I've felt like I've learned nothing at all, where my mistakes have been obvious to me (and probably to everybody else involved) and my victories have been conducted against enemies too busy screaming at each other or eating paint to make it mean anything. There is always, however, a way to learn.

Diablo 3 patch 2.1 emphasizes speeding through content, and that's a good thing

Leif Johnson at

Diablo 3 normally isn't a particularly rushed game. The end of the world may be at hand, but it’s typically content to let you slice through the minions of Hell at your own pace, comparing loot and weighing stats as you go. That all changes with patch 2.1, which went live at the end of August. Both the new Greater Rifts and Seasons place an emphasis on speed, whether it’s in beating timed rifts for a chance at better loot or by competing against other players to reach the level cap anew (and pile up new weapons and transmog items in the process). Combine all that with powerful new legendary gems, and the result is a patch that injects Diablo 3 with a powerful shot of adrenaline.


Show Us Your Rig: Minecraft creator Markus "Notch" Persson

PC Gamer at

Welcome to Show Us Your Rig, where we feature the PC gaming industry's best and brightest as they show us the systems they use to work and play.

Markus “Notch” Persson, creator of Minecraft, has a powerful rig with a deceptive appearance. Hidden behind its ancient keyboard and healthy layer of dust, Persson’s computer houses some serious punch. Notch was kind enough to spend some time telling us about his set-up, what he’s been playing lately, and the keyboard that has withstood the test of time.

The pile of shame: an unconquerable mountain

Andy Kelly at

Choice. That’s one thing a PC gamer is never short of, thanks to cheap games, seasonal sales, and pay-what-you-want bundles. Over the years my Steam library has grown into a vast, overwhelming thing, bursting with games I’ve never, or barely, played.


Metro 2033 Redux video: max settings at 2560x1440 on LPC

PC Gamer at

We’ve already shown you what Metro 2033 Redux looks like when put side-by-side with the original, but the game looks so darn pretty that we wanted show it off in wonderful fullscreen. So we fed it to that benevolent giant we call the Large Pixel Collider and ran it on max settings at 2560x1440 resolution. You can also check out our review of Metro 2033 Redux here.


The most baffling Steam reviews

Christopher Livingston at

Before buying a game, it's a good idea to visit several different sources to determine if it's worth your time and money. Read reviews on gaming sites. Watch your favorite YouTube personality play it. See what people are saying on Twitter. Ask random people on the street. Call up your elected political representative. Buy a copy of the World's Number One Gaming Magazine. Buy several copies, in case something happens to your first copy.

You can even check out reviews on Steam, written by people who have played the game. Just use caution. While there are plenty of great writers filing reviews on Steam, there are also, shall we say, not-that. Here are a few of the weirdest, silliest, and worst reviews we've seen on Steam.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

PC Gamer at

Each week PC Gamer’s opinion scryers emerge from their blackened temple to hold forth on the most significant moments of the past seven days. They usually bring biscuits too.


The PC Gamer Show episode 5: PAX Prime 2014

Wes Fenlon at

It's The PC Gamer Show! In episode five, Evan and Tyler dive into the mayhem of PAX Prime to to talk to some of our favorite developers (Chris Roberts! Tim Schafer!) and play some of the PC's most exciting games.