Dr. Lisa Su: 'With our launch of Zen 4 we don't expect any supply constraints.'

Dr. Lisa Su holding an AMD Ryzen 9 7950X CPU
(Image credit: AMD)
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We've become used to the new shiny things being completely unavailable at launch, and lately that's been down to a supply chain crisis that hamstrung the entire industry. AMD's popular CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, however, does not see that being an issue for the upcoming Zen 4 CPU launch.

At today's Ryzen 7000-series processor announcement in Austin, Dr. Su responded to a question from the gathered audience about supply chain disruption in relation to the release of its new CPUs.

"It is true that if you look at the past 18 months there have been a number of things, whether its capacity limitations or logistics," says Dr. Su. "From an AMD standpoint, we have dramatically increased our overall capacity, in terms of wafers, as well as substrates and on the back end. So with our launch of Zen 4 we don't expect any supply constraints. 

"Logistically it takes a little bit longer for things to get into region. So we're having this event at the end of August and we're on sale on September 27. One of the reasons for that time, frankly, is to make sure that we do have product in region so that people can really look at buying across the board."

That's great news for anyone looking to make the big upgrade to the brand new Ryzen platform. There will be a host of high-end motherboards, as well as four distinct Ryzen 7000-series processors hitting the market on September 27.

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Header Cell - Column 0 PriceCores | ThreadsBase clockBoost clockCache (L2+L3)TDP
Ryzen 9 7950X$69916 | 324.5GHz5.7GHz80MB170W
Ryzen 9 7900X$54912 | 244.7GHz5.6GHz76MB170W
Ryzen 7 7700X$3998 | 164.5GHz5.4GHz40MB105W
Ryzen 5 7600X$2996 | 124.7GHz5.3GHz38MB105W

AMD has already spoken about the increased performance outlook for its new Zen 4 processors (opens in new tab)—positing a ~13% IPC gain over its previous generation. Compared with the 8 - 10% increase it initially suggested back at Computex, that's a bit of a jump. And is a good sign of the health of the new architecture at the start of its life.

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Dave has been gaming since the days of Zaxxon and Lady Bug on the Colecovision, and code books for the Commodore Vic 20 (Death Race 2000!). He built his first gaming PC at the tender age of 16, and finally finished bug-fixing the Cyrix-based system around a year later. When he dropped it out of the window. He first started writing for Official PlayStation Magazine and Xbox World many decades ago, then moved onto PC Format full-time, then PC Gamer, TechRadar, and T3 among others. Now he's back, writing about the nightmarish graphics card market, CPUs with more cores than sense, gaming laptops hotter than the sun, and SSDs more capacious than a Cybertruck.