Steam

Final Fantasy IV makes a very quiet appearance on Steam

Andy Chalk at

Final Fantasy IV debuted on the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1991, which means that if it was a human being it likely would have graduated college by now. But it's not a person, it's a videogame, and so instead of going to college, it's gone to Steam.

Quake Live joins Steam this week, watch the launch trailer here

Shaun Prescott at

Quake Live is a seriously beautiful game. The fluidity, the colours, the mindboggling levels of skill it can accommodate... it's easy to forget its appeal until you see the game in action. There's also a certain '90s nostalgia attached to the series as a whole, which is compounded by the Moby-esque music playing over this launch trailer. Take a look below.


Twitch chat bot plagues Steam users with wallet-emptying malware

Andy Chalk at

If you've recently been invited to take part in a raffle for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive items while chatting in Twitch, the good people at F-Secure have a bit of advice: Don't do it.


Fable Anniversary will support modding with included Unreal Engine 3 editor

Andy Chalk at

Fable Anniversary arrives on Steam on September 12, bringing with it improved graphics, Steam achievements and a closet full of swanky outfits. But there may be even more than that to look forward to, as Lionhead has confirmed that it will also include support for player-created mods.

PC owners more likely to wait for price drops before purchasing, according to NPD

Shaun Prescott at

We all talk in hushed tones about our backlog, and we all feel that weirdly conflicted emotion, somewhere between glee and horror, when the Steam sale commences. So it's no surprise that a new NPD study has discovered that 50 per cent of US PC gamers wait for discounts or price drops before purchasing.


The pile of shame: an unconquerable mountain

Andy Kelly at

Choice. That’s one thing a PC gamer is never short of, thanks to cheap games, seasonal sales, and pay-what-you-want bundles. Over the years my Steam library has grown into a vast, overwhelming thing, bursting with games I’ve never, or barely, played.


The most baffling Steam reviews

Christopher Livingston at

Before buying a game, it's a good idea to visit several different sources to determine if it's worth your time and money. Read reviews on gaming sites. Watch your favorite YouTube personality play it. See what people are saying on Twitter. Ask random people on the street. Call up your elected political representative. Buy a copy of the World's Number One Gaming Magazine. Buy several copies, in case something happens to your first copy.

You can even check out reviews on Steam, written by people who have played the game. Just use caution. While there are plenty of great writers filing reviews on Steam, there are also, shall we say, not-that. Here are a few of the weirdest, silliest, and worst reviews we've seen on Steam.


Steam Client Beta update brings better AMD support to in-home streaming

Shaun Prescott at

Another week, another Steam Client Beta update. The biggest addition comes in the form of in-home streaming support for AMD. VCE hardware encoding of Direct 3D Games is now possible, so long as you have one of the following cards with the latest drivers: Radeon HD 79xx, Radeon HD 78xx, Radeon HD 77xx, R9 295x, R9 290x/290, R9 280x/280, R9 270x/270, R7 265, R7 260x/260, R7 250x.


The Stomping Land can no longer be purchased from Steam

Andy Chalk at

The Stomping Land saga has taken another twist, as the game is no longer available for purchase on Steam. It's still on Steam, to be perfectly clear about it, you just can't actually buy the thing anymore. Unfortunately, the disappearance of the purchase option was not accompanied by an explanation for its absence, so depending on your perspective, this might be good news or bad news.

Valve is being sued by an Australian consumer watchdog

Shaun Prescott at

Valve is being taken to court by The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. The ACCC is alleging that Valve has not fulfilled mandatory consumer guarantees under the Australian Consumer Law. While neither Valve or Steam has any physical presence in Australia, the company must observe Australian law when it provides goods or services to Australians.


Why you should use Darkadia to show off your game collection

Andy Chalk at

Steam makes it easy to collect games, but as a tool for maintaining a collection it suffers from a few shortcomings. It's not much use for cataloging Infocom classics, say, or that Splinter Cell special edition that came in a metal lunchbox, and some die-hard collectors—people who'll pass on a game because the packaging is just a little too banged up—may not consider "owning" a game on Steam the same as having it parked in a place of pride on a shelf.

That's where Darkadia comes in. It's a website that simplifies the process of organizing and tracking videogame collections with a substantial degree of control and detail. Darkadia also makes it easy to show off collections to other gamers around the world: I've got 170 digital boxes arranged in glorious rows on my Darkadia shelves—not the entirety of my collection, but a solid start—and man, they look good.


Steam client beta update enables simultaneous game installs

Andy Chalk at

A recent update to the Steam client beta has made it a whole lot easier to install multiple games at the same time.


Why critics love Mountain, but Steam users are calling it "worthless"

Tyler Wilde at

According to The Atlantic, Mountain “invites you to experience the chasm between your own subjectivity and the unfathomable experience of something else.” It “hypnotized” the Los Angeles Times, and The Verge called it "the only experience that has ever made me feel sad about a geological phenomenon." Meanwhile, on Steam, user reviewers are gushing: Mountain is “worthless,” “just a screensaver,” and “a fucking joke.”


Hellgate tries its luck with Steam Greenlight

Andy Chalk at

Remember Hellgate: London? It was a near-future action-RPG set in a post-apocalyptic world shattered by an invasion of demons. The focus was on single-player gameplay but there was a strong multiplayer element to it as well, with PvP action and instanced, team-based quests. It was a cool idea (I thought so, anyway) but the execution faltered, and the servers were taken offline in early 2009. It was resurrected as a free-to-play online game a few years ago, but that didn't gain any traction with North American audiences either. Now it's taking a run at Steam.


Super Time Force Ultra comes to Steam next week, will (probably) feature TF2 characters

Phil Savage at

Okay, congratulations indie games, you did it again. For a while I thought Capy's Super Time Force wouldn't make it to PC, which—given the reviews of its Xbone version—would have been a shame. Naturally, I was worrying over nothing. Not only will the 2D action time-travel-'em-up release on Steam on 25 August, but it'll arrive in a special Ultra edition.


How to set up Steam in-home streaming on your PC

Wes Fenlon at

Steam in-home streaming may be the future of PC gaming in the living room. Sure, you can build a powerful gaming machine for the living room. But that's expensive. You might be able to run an HDMI cable from your desktop to your big screen TV. But that's usually impractical. In-home streaming is the third option: you use an old PC, or build a low-power client box, to stream games over your home network. Valve's in-home streaming started as an exclusive beta feature in Steam, but now it's built right into the client and available to anyone. It only takes about five minutes to set up, and it works amazingly well.

If you're ready to try out in-home streaming yourself, I'll walk you through the whole process: how to enable streaming in Steam, what kind of host PC and client you'll need, how to make sure your home network is up to the task, and how to control your games once they're up and running.

Upcoming Steam store changes could include content curators and a personalised frontpage

Phil Savage at

The Steam store page could soon be drastically changing. That's according to SteamDB, who have been sleuthing out CSS stylesheets and digging through updates to the Steam Translation Server. Their investigations have found references to new content curation options, new frontpage behaviour, and a variety of additional improvements.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

PC Gamer at

Each week PC Gamer’s poets in residence gather their thoughts on the previous seven days. Weirdly, it never seems to rhyme.

Steam Client Beta update allows you to hide games from your library

Shaun Prescott at

A bit reluctant to advertise to the world that you've accrued 200+ hours in Leisure Suit Larry? Well never fear, because a new update to Steam's beta client allows you to hide games from your library. In a world of oversharing, the option will no doubt appeal to those prone to guilty pleasures. The option is available in the 'Set Categories' menu, and once you've selected to hide a title it will appear in a new hidden category.


Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies announced, from the team that brought you Counter-Strike Online

Tom Sykes at

It's easy to forget that Counter-Strike Online is a thing, given that Valve don't typically license out their games to other developers and publishers, but the free-to-play spin-off has been going for about six years now, under South Korean developers and publishers Nexon. Following the release of Counter-Strike Online 2 a couple of years ago, Nexon has announced another entry in the series and, naturally, it's themed around zombies. Free-to-play multiplayer FPS Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies will be heading to Steam this Summer/Autumn.