Payday 2 is ditching microtransactions

Following the next update, all safes will open for free.

There was a huge uproar among the Payday community last year when Overkill added microtransactions to Payday 2 in the Black Market update, despite a 2013 promise not to. Now that decision has been reversed: Overkill parent Starbreeze Studios announced today that it has acquired the full rights to the Payday franchise from publisher 505 Games, and said microtransactions will be removed from Payday 2 in the next update. 

“We are freeing up the black market,” Producer Almir Listo says in the video. “Starting with the next update in Payday 2, any old-generation safes in the loot drop will stop to drop. Any new-generation safe, going forward, will drop completely for free. You will still be able to trade all the old and new generation safes and items using the Steam Marketplace. Your prices [and] supply and demand will still continue to shape the Payday 2 marketplace. Any new generation safes that drop will be dropping completely for free, and will continue to have different rarities and qualities, depending on what kind of items you get. The only difference is, now you open them for free.” 

“Fuck that broke-dick piece of shit drill,” he added. 

Starbreeze pledged to continue developing new content for Payday 2 for at least 18 more months, and while it was a safe assumption that it was going to happen anyway, the announcement also effectively confirms that Payday 3 is coming. The deal with 505 Games gives it a 33 percent cut of the net revenues on sales of Payday 3, capped at $40 million, after Starbreeze has fully recouped its development and marketing costs. 

There's also an interesting teaser that begins around the 3:45 mark of the video featuring Dallas, Chains, and Dragan, so either sit through it, skip to it, or watch it separately here. The short version? Bikers. More will be revealed next month at E3.


As lead news writer during ‘merican hours, Andy covers the day-to-day events that keep PC gaming so interesting, exciting, and occasionally maddening. He’s fond of RPGs, FPSs, dungeons, Myst, and the glorious irony of his parents buying him a TRS-80 instead of an Atari so he wouldn't end up wasting his life on videogames.
We recommend