The PlayStation Now PC streaming service is live, here's what it looks like

Six new games have been added to the 400+ library as well.

PlayStation Now, Sony's streaming service that gives players access to over 400 PS3 games, is now live on the PC in the UK and US. For $19.99 (£12.99) a month you get access to a huge library of PS3 games (with PSX and PS2 games supposedly coming down the line), a good portion of which have been exclusive to consoles, until now. There's also a seven-day free trial if you're on the fence. With the launch of the service comes six additional games, a few of which aren't playable on the PC anywhere else:

  • Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch
  • Heavy Rain
  • Sid Meier's Civilization Revolution

See the rest of our favorite games from the service here.

The client itself is pretty simple, a big assemblage of scrolling boxes divided into categories that looks pretty similar to Netflix' interface. There's even a 'list' which functions as a queue. Pretty convenient.

Games are pretty easy to get into as well. Launch a game and the service will connect with a server, load up in your profile, download the cloud saves (if you have any), and then bam, you're in it. Nearly any controller will work too. I played some God of War with an Xbox Elite controller and felt downright naughty. Even if it's running at a low resolution from a server a few hundred miles away, it feels pretty rad. 

I tested out a few games, and while we'll have some more extensive impressions soon, I was impressed with how responsive my input was. Street Fighter IV played liked Street Fighter IV, with almost no discernible input lag. I'm sure a pro would notice, but I was pulling off basic combos without issue. Most impressive is the sheer convenience of the application. It's simple, slick, and the novelty of having a low-impact resizable window with The Last of Us on my second monitor is something else.  


At only 11 years old, James took apart his parents’ computer and couldn’t figure out how to put it back together again. As an Associate Editor, he’s embarked on a dangerous quest to solve Video Games. Wish him luck.


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