The Church in the Darkness gameplay trailer demonstrates a jungle rescue gone wrong

Run through the jungle.

I'm quite taken by the idea of The Church in the Darkness. Announced earlier this year, it's set in a very isolated religious colony called Freedom Town, established in the South American jungle as a refuge from the oppressive US government. You're hired by the mother of one of its members to determine if he's truly happy there, and if not, to get him out—something the other colonists aren't too keen on. 

What makes it interesting is that Freedom Town might not necessarily be Jonestown, where roughly 900 members of a religious cult committed mass suicide in 1978. It might be legit, its people happy and free, and its leaders, Isaac and Rebecca Walker, honestly questing for nothing more sinister than a better way of life. But maybe not, too. Probably not, is my guess. 

The stealth mechanics in the gameplay trailer, narrated by writer and designer Richard Rouse, look a little rough, but he also appears to be rushing through bits and pieces of it to show off some of the game's different elements: Stealth, shooting, a little bit of conversation, and little surprises like the one seen near the end of the video. But whether The Church in the Darkness stumbles or succeeds will depend first and foremost on the story it tells, and maybe even more importantly, how it tells it: If it's able to effectively mix things up so that outcomes aren't predictable after two or three playthroughs. 

(And if you think those voices on the PA sound familiar, you're not wrong. Rebecca and Isaac are portrayed by Ellen McLain, best known as the voice of Portal's GlaDOS, and her real-life husband, John Patrick Lowrie, the Sniper.) 

The Church in the Darkness is set to come out in early 2017. Find out more at paranoidproductions.com.
 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

As lead news writer during ‘merican hours, Andy covers the day-to-day events that keep PC gaming so interesting, exciting, and occasionally maddening. He’s fond of RPGs, FPSs, dungeons, Myst, and the glorious irony of his parents buying him a TRS-80 instead of an Atari so he wouldn't end up wasting his life on videogames.
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