survival

The Long Dark makes the perilous trek to Steam Early Access in September

Tom Sykes at

Andy was impressed when he got his frostbitten hands on The Long Dark, so the news that it's heading to Steam Early Access soon is reason to be cheerful. (Unless it arrives a bit too broken to enjoy, of course.) Developers Hinterland Games have announced the date on which we can expect the game, along with details of what the Early Access version will entail. September 22nd is the entry to circle in your diary with your last remaining ounce of energy, giving the people that find your corpse plenty to chew on as they poke around in your cabin and pilfer your supplies.


These stunning Shelter 2 screenshots (just about) make up for the game's slight delay

Tom Sykes at

I'm not entirely sure it's legal for a game to look this good. I mean, just look at it. Outside of the original teaser trailer and a particularly impressive gif, we haven't seen much of Shelter 2 in motion yet, but if it looks even half as beautifully stylised as this new set of images, we're going to be in for a visual treat. If you can tear yourself away from the left side of Might and Delight's July newsletter, there's a cruel sentence on the right announcing that the animal-based survival game is going to miss its August release date and slip further into Autumn/Fall. In the words of the judge from Futurama, I'm going to allow this, but only if they use the time to curb the elements many people found frustrating about the first game.


Survival gets serious in The Long Dark

Andy Kelly at

Last week I wrote about the problem with survival games. Some of you loved the idea of the hypothetical game I described—which sidelines monsters and overt danger for a more atmospheric battle against the elements—and some of you thought I was mental. After the article was published I was tweeted by Hinterland Games creative director Raphael van Lierop, who said that their game, The Long Dark, is exactly what I’m looking for. So, of course, I had to try it.


The problem with survival games

Andy Kelly at

Have you ever seen Survivorman? It’s a documentary series about a guy called Les Stroud who spends a week in the world’s most inhospitable places—deserts, rainforests, tundras—and survives with only the clothes on his back. Fakers like Bear Grylls have doctors on hand, camera crews, and cosy hotels to return to after filming, but Stroud does it all for real—and films everything himself. It’s really good TV, and I promise that after you watch the first episode you’ll be hooked.


Unturned review (Early Access)

Andy Kelly at

Unturned is a DayZ-style survival sim with a Minecraft-inspired art style. I don’t blame you if you’ve already tuned out. PC is awash with DayZ and Minecraft clones. But Unturned is notable in that it’s currently the fourth most-played game on Steam, beating Football Manager, Skyrim, and Garry’s Mod by many thousands of players—and it was developed by a sixteen year-old. It’s an amazing story—the kind only possible on PC—but is the game itself actually any good?


The Long Dark gets moody trailer and heads for Steam Early Access

Tim Clark at

Good news for those of you looking forward to scratching around for food and warmth in the aftermath of a geo-magnetic catastrophe. And hey, who isn't? There's not too much longer to wait. The Long Dark, which is the hugely promising artsy survival game from debutant studio Hinterland Games is heading for Steam Early Access in September.


Don't Starve Together trailer shows haunting multiplayer, meaty effigies

Tom Sykes at

We already knew that Klei's beautifully illustrated survival game Don't Starve would be getting a multiplayer component this summer, but we hadn't yet seen a glimmer of it in action. If you think I'm leading up to a new trailer showing the new multiplayer mode in action...well, you're dead right. The following prototype footage reveals that it involves ghosts and meat-based effigies, just like my fourteenth birthday.


The Forest alpha review

Andy Kelly at

I’ve been playing The Forest today, and whenever anyone’s come over to my desk to watch I’ve been savaging an animal. Spearing fish with a stick, murderising turtles with an axe, and at one point I’d battered so many seagulls with a rock that the resulting pile of feathery bodies slowed the game down to a crawl. As I type this, it’s the second best-selling game on Steam. It would be the first, but a 75% sale on Injustice is getting in the way. Am I enjoying it? Yeah, but I think it’s important I tell you from the off that it’s incredibly janky and limited, even for an Early Access title. At this point in time it feels more like a proof of concept than a game, but what I’ve seen so far shows a lot of promise indeed.


The Stomping Land steps delicately onto Steam Early Access, offers multiplayer dino-based survival

Tom Sykes at

Rust toys with the idea of pre/post-historic man fighting for survival against the elements and against his fellow man, but what that really boiled down to was a bunch of naked men flapping their dongs around while battering your house down in an effort to nick your stuff. The Stomping Ground, by the looks of things, is the real prehistoric deal, pitting man against his greatest-enemy-that-wasn't-actually-around-at-the-same-time-as-him, the dinosaur. SuperCrit's game feasted on all of your Kickstarter money at around this time last year, and now it's appeared on Steam Early Access, dinoskin-cap in hand. Let's see how it's coming along, eh?


Minecraft Realms now available worldwide

Omri Petitte at

Mojang's Minecraft Realms subscription service for simple server hosting and parental controls has launched worldwide after beta testing this month, giving everyone the chance to sign up and use the feature.


BioShock Infinite's Columbia appears in the skies of Minecraft

Omri Petitte at

What if Elizabeth tore open a rift, but instead of yanking out a crate of guns or a Gatling-wielding automaton, she withdraws a square-shaped chunk of grass before chucking it at your face with a "Booker, catch!"? I'd sputter in confusion, but that probably also means BioShock Infinite's heroine found her way to the Minecraft-ed version of the floating city of Columbia. Constructed by architect group TheVoxelBox of the Planet Minecraft fansite, the city boasts superb detail and personality worthy of the game's best custom creations.


H1Z1 footage shows that, yep, it looks a lot like DayZ [Update: DayZ similarities addressed in Reddit post]

Tom Sykes at

The Long Dark's creative director reckons the apocalypse doesn't have to feature zombies - but, erm, here's one more open world post-apocalyptic game that does. As announced last week, Sony's entry into the DayZ genre is the wittily (if clinically) named H1Z1, a game that differentiates itself from Dean Hall and Bohemia's game by...well, that part's not totally clear yet, but it's been a fairly democratic process so far. H1Z1 game designer Jimmy Whisenhunt and technical director Tom Schenk took to Twitch a few hours ago to show off the game as it stands now; you'll find 50-odd minutes of walking, zombie-battering, scavenging and driving, in a game that admittedly looks very pretty but so far doesn't seem to boast any distinguishing characteristics.


Echo of the Wilds is a survival game, but not in the Minecraft sense

Tom Sykes at

Survival doesn't have to involve procedural generation, crafty mines or zig-zagging zombies - too few games concern themselves with the spiritual/philosophical/Call of the Wild side of living out in the wilderness, subsisting on berries and avoiding bears. Echo of the Wilds is one game that does. It's an adventure/survival game featuring a beautifully crisp art style, exploration and gathering and crafting out the wazoo, and a metaphysical story involving an incongruous TV screen and a semi-translucent girl. It's not another Minecraft clone is what I'm saying. Echo of the Wilds is out now, has a demo up for grabs, and can be witnessed in video form below.


Rust diary, part 2: "It's hard to kill a naked jumping man"

Christopher Livingston at

It's the dead of night and I'm in my cabin, which, at the moment, is essentially just a box. But I have plans for expansion. Big plans! Like adding a second box. Next to the main box. So it'll be two boxes. Anyway, I'm crafting with the spoils of my daytime scavenging and hunting. I've got ore simmering in the furnace, food cooking in the campfire, and I'm banging together some new building materials at my workbench. That's when I hear footsteps outside. They approach slowly, crunching through the grass, until they're right outside my cabin wall. Then they stop. Then... nothing.


Survive the horrors of war as a civilian in This War of Mine

Emanuel Maiberg at

War. What is it good for? Absolutely nothing—except video games. War is the perfect backdrop for video games because it offers a straightforward conflict and goal that you can build a game around: kill the enemy. But as history teaches us, the real victims of war are the civilians caught between the armed forces on either side, an issue that almost none of the countless war games we play ever address. This War of Mine, a new game from Anomaly developer 11 Bit Studios, is dedicated to this issue.


Rust diary, part 1: "Frosh Man has a gun!"

Christopher Livingston at

By now, we're completely familiar with the basics of crafting games. You hit a tree until it becomes tree parts, then use the tree parts to build wooden things. You smash a rock until it becomes ore, then smelt the ore to build metal things. You meet a half-naked guy named Batman, and he follows you around for ten minutes eerily moaning, "Take me to your house. Show me your house. Show me your houuuuuse." Actually, that last part might not be common to crafting games. But Batman's weirdness is not that unusual in Rust, the early-access crafting survival game from Facepunch Studios.


Sir, You Are Being Hunted update brings tweaked variables, creepy landowner

Phil Savage at

A new update has been released for Sir, You Are Being Hunted. For many, that'll be good news, although I suspect the game's own robot hunters wouldn't see it that way. Not because they've been weakened - in fact their ranks have been bolstered by the new Landowner NPC - but because the rest of this update is designed to improve the 'feel' of the game. There's nothing like talk of feelings to alienate AI constructs.


4,621 Rust players banned by new anti-cheat software

Tyler Wilde at

Naked cavemen can't fly, or at least, they shouldn't fly. In multiplayer survival sim Rust, nudity is encouraged, but using software to disrespect gravity, walls, or augment a human's natural aiming ability is punishable by permanent ban. CheatPunch, a new anti-cheat system described in yesterday's update notes, has already detected and banned 4,621 players.


Rust update throws out zombies, improves nature

Omri Petitte at

In some ways, Rust is like a big, pastoral representation of life. Your ramshackle hut, built through sweat and tears, stands for the your accomplishments. The weighty rock you use to crush an interloper's head like a grape? That's just being a friendly neighbor. And the zombies...well, I still don't know what the zombies mean, but they're pretty annoying. So much so, in fact, that Facepunch's latest update yanks them out of its sandbox survival-thon entirely—replacing them with less-stupid animals.


DayZ patch paves the way for more player and zombie numbers, adds new gestures

Phil Savage at

DayZ has received a new stable patch, although, in the world of early access survival games, the term stable is somewhat relative. The update brings some minor features and bug fixes, but the most important change is the continued improvement of server performance. Thanks to "a significant change to the server variable processing," the game's servers should have received a major performance boost. According to the patch notes, this should result in a smoother game experience and, more significantly, is another step towards the goal of increased player and zombie numbers, as well as the enabling of loot and zombie respawning.