No One Lives Forever

No One Lives Forever trademark filing hints at possible re-release

Omri Petitte at

As we reported last year, the rights to Monolith's 2000 comedy spy shooter No One Lives Forever dropped off the radar after Activision proverbially shrugged its shoulders as to the whereabouts of the game's ownership. Now, Siliconera has exposed some new intel on the franchise's trademark from a number of recent filings by Night Dive Studios, a classic PC game republisher. This isn't direct confirmation of NOLF's return to the field, but it sparks hope for the game's licensing troubles.

The best shooters of all time

PC Gamer at

Before we knew what to name them, we called them “Doom clones.” id Software’s seminal work sparked a phenomenon when it began to circulate as shareware 20 years ago, and since then shooters have propagated through mods, experimentation, LAN parties, co-op, eSports, and big-budget masterpieces. Guns and enemies are their bread and butter, but we don’t think of our favorite shooters as outlets for simulated violence. We celebrate the way they test our minds and mouse reflexes, the personal stories they generate, the captivating worlds they’ve founded, and the social spaces they provide for lighthearted bonding or hardcore competition.



Let's Reboot... No One Lives Forever

Tim Stone at

“Let’s Reboot” takes a look back at a classic in need of a new outing or a beloved series gone stale and asks how it might be best redesigned or given a kick up the backside for today’s gaming audience. The Rules: Assume a free hand, and a decent budget, but realistic technology and expectations. This week’s sacred cow – an FPS with jokes by Mel Brooks and Mike Myers, gadgets by Q, and bulletproof vests by Mary Quant."

Confusion over the ownership of stealthy Sixties shooter No One Lives Forever might be bad for budget release prospects, but it's great for those of us who spend our time pacing around inside hollowed-out volcanoes, fondling fluffy felines and planning the fourth instalment.

No One Lives Forever lives in licensing limbo

Phil Savage at

System Shock 2 may have shaken free from captivity, but there are plenty of classic games still trapped in a licensing no man's land, prevented from receiving a digital re-release. One of those games is No One Lives Forever, Monolith's 60s set comedy spy shooter. It was originally published by Fox Interactive, who were acquired by Vivendi in 2003, who merged with Activision in 2008. So do Activision have the rights? Their community manager Dan Amrich released a coded message, using an obscure cryptic language called English, about why Cate Archer has gone MIA.


Why you must replay No One Lives Forever

PC Gamer at

Seconds after I agreed to replay No One Lives Forever for this article, I was wracked with doubts. Would it be as rib-tickling as I remembered it or as wonderfully diverse? Would it still seem as imaginative?