LPC

Pixel Boost: No One Lives Forever 2 at 1440p

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month, Pixel Boost guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: Cate Archer lives forever (in our hearts).

It's been 12 years since the PC hosted the adventures of 1960s superspy Cate Archer. Twelve years too long. If you've played NOLF or its sequel, No One Lives Forever 2: A Spy in H.A.R.M.'s Way, you know why they're some of the best shooters of all time: smart AI, inventive weaponry, and an endlessly witty script. They were also some of the best-looking games of the early 2000s, which means they hold up remarkably well today--with a little tinkering to add widescreen support and higher resolutions. While the rights to the NOLF games have been lost to legal limbo for years, a trademark filing back in May could hint that they'll finally show up on Steam or GOG in the future. For now, the only way to play them is to load up a trusty old CD copy. If you've got one, it's time to Pixel Boost.

NeoTokyo video: max settings at 2560x1440 on LPC

PC Gamer at

NeoTokyo, the Half-Life 2-mod-turned-full-game, may be running on the old horse that is the Source engine, but it still sports some lovely cyberpunk skylines. It also shows that we can throw the Large Pixel Collider, our inconceivably beefy gaming rig, onto the back of that old horse and squeeze out every bit of cyberpunk goodness we can get at 2560x1440 and ultra settings.

Pixel Boost: Halo: Combat Evolved at 5120x2880

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month, Pixel Boost guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: Halo PC survives the death of Gamespy.

I lost the entire summer of 2004 to Halo on the PC. While my family PC was still an aging Pentium 4, my best friend (who lived a convenient five minutes away) scored a beastly gaming rig powered by a 2.8GHz AMD CPU and a 128MB ATI 9600. It could play anything, and in the summer of 2004, our game of choice was Halo on the PC. We'd take turns playing multiplayer for days straight, honing our pistol skills to get those crucial three-shot kills. Servers hosted CTF matches that lasted for hours. Today, Halo: Custom Edition still has a small but active playerbase thanks to a Bungie patch (11 years after release!) that replaced Gamespy with new master servers. The patch also added support for resolutions up to 4800x3600. You know what that means—it's time to Pixel Boost.

Star Citizen video: Arena Commander at 2560x1440 on LPC

Tyler Wilde at

I sat down at the Large Pixel Collider earlier this week pumped for some space violence, but you're not going to see me lasering anything to pieces. Watch this 1440p, max settings video of my first experience with Star Citizen's new Arena Commander mode, and see me be bad at dogfighting. Pretty, though!


Watch Dogs video: max settings at 1920x1080 on LPC

Wes Fenlon at

Watch Dogs launched with some performance issues on PC that cause serious stuttering and lag on some systems. Ubisoft is still working on a patch to iron out those problems. To see how the game performed for us on ultra settings, we threw Watch Dogs at the LPC and recorded some open world driving, hacking, shooting mayhem with Nvidia Shadowplay.


The keyboard of the Large Pixel Collider

Wes Fenlon at

We've picked a keyboard that can handle the gaming demands of our supercomputing overlord, the Large Pixel Collider.


Pixel Boost: Command and Conquer Red Alert 2

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month Wes guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each Pixel Boost guide comes with a free side of high-res screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: eternal classic Red Alert 2.

Red Alert 2 is not the most balanced Command & Conquer. It's not the most stable—multiplayer matches ended in crashes more often than not. It's not the most serious (that's probably Generals) and it's not the goofiest (that's probably Red Alert 3). But it's my favorite, because it includes a little bit of what made every C&C game special. Westwood upped the production value if its FMV cutscenes without sacrificing the camp and built a huge range of creative units without straying from C&C's messy large-scale battles. Until the Minecraft era, Westwood was also one of the only developers to make smart use of voxels, and Red Alert 2's colorful world and soldiers still look cool 14 years later. RA2 isn't the easiest game to find these days, but if you have a copy, it's still possible to run the game at high-res in modern Windows.

Wolfenstein: The New Order video: max settings at 2560x1440 on LPC

Wes Fenlon at

Akimbo assault rifles, 1440p Ultra settings, and shooting lots of Nazis in the face—these are all things the Large Pixel Collider, our all-powerful supercomputer, heartily approves of. That's why we ran B.J. Blazkowicz's latest adventure, Wolftenstein: The New Order, with all the settings cranked to the max. Sit back, set Youtube's bitrate to 1440p, and enjoy seven minutes of old school FPS action.


See Wolfenstein: The New Order at max settings: 3600x1920 on LPC

Tyler Wilde at

We've encountered some problems running Wolfenstein: The New Order since we started playing this morning, and though the LPC's GTX Titans haven't suffered any crashes and the framerate is stable, the same id Tech 5 texture pop-in we witnessed in Rage is very apparent. But if I don't turn too fast, the artists and engine have pulled off one trick: some really damn nice textures.


Pixel Boost: Hitman: Codename 47 at 4K

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month Wes guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each Pixel Boost guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: our favorite bald assassin's first outing in Hitman: Codename 47.

2012's Hitman: Absolution brought Agent 47 back into the assassination business, though not in the way we hoped. Gone were the sprawling levels that made up Blood Money's brilliantly intricate murder simulator. Six years before IO Interactive perfected the Hitman formula, though, it tapped into that first spark of brilliance with Hitman: Codename 47. The first Hitman introduced the series staples that its sequels would build on: disguises, hiding bodies, observing guard patterns. Codename 47 doesn't love modern Windows, but with a few simple setting changes (thanks OpenGL!) it runs like a champ, even at 4K.

See CS:GO with everything cranked up: 4320x2560 on LPC

Evan Lahti at

Source is certainly showing some wrinkles in comparison to, say, UE4, but CS:GO remains the premier competitive shooter on PC today. Even after a decade half of history with the franchise, we still love the look and feel of its classic maps and their modern iterations: Mirage's A bombsite, Inferno's "banana" path, or Dust 2's dim tunnel.


Pixel Boost: Vampire the Masquerade: Bloodlines at 4K

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month Wes guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each Pixel Boost guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: the enduring Legacy of Vampire the Masquerade: Bloodlines.

It's incredible that Vampire the Masquerade is 10 years old, and the fan community is still patching it to make it a better game. That's dedication. And Bloodlines is a game worth being dedicated to—the writing is up there with other RPG masterpieces like Planescape Torment. And there's vampire politics! Insane Malkavians! Unfortunately, Bloodlines was a buggy mess 10 years ago, and even after a decade of fan patches and fixes, it can be a challenging, intimidating game to run on modern Windows. But it can be done, and I've compiled the most helpful instructions and mods to make Vampire: the Masquerade Bloodlines run, even in 4K.

Dark Souls 2 comparison video: Xbox 360 vs. PC at 1080p

Cory Banks at

Dark Souls: Prepare To Die Edition was a bad port of a brilliant game. Dark Souls 2, on the other hand, is a well-made PC port (even super-modder Durante thinks so). But just hearing that isn't enough: how much better does it look on PC than on consoles?

To find out, we made this video of side-by-side comparisons between the Xbox 360 version and the PC version running at 1080p, with all settings set to max, on the Large Pixel Collider. Let the footage be the judge—which do you think looks better?

Pixel Boost: Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month Wes guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each Pixel Boost guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast.

When it comes to Star Wars games, they don't make 'em like they used to. In the late 90s and early 2000s, the Dark Forces and Jedi Knight series married fun first-person action—full of iconic weapons and sound effects—with stories and characters from a larger fictional world. Kyle Katarn! Mara Jade! Luke Skywalker! They were all there, and the games they were in were good. After the first two Dark Forces, LucasArts handed the reigns to Raven Software, who amped up the lightsaber combat and multiplayer. All of the Jedi Knight games are available on Steam, so I relived my childhood Star Wars fandom with Jedi Outcast and took 25 4K screenshots in the process.

Pixel Boost: Unreal Tournament 2004 at 4K

Wes Fenlon at

Twice a month Wes guides you through the hacks, tricks, and mods you'll need to run a classic PC game on Windows 7/8. Each Pixel Boost guide comes with a free side of 4K screenshots from the LPC celebrating the graphics of PC gaming's past. This week: Unreal Tournament 2004 turns 10.

Unreal Tournament 2004 turned a decade old in March. There's still nothing as thrillingly tense as an Instagib match on Facing Worlds, nothing as smooth and satisfying as snatching up a Flak Cannon and instantly turning someone into flying giblets with a spread of molten shrapnel. It's just as much fun as you remember, and the online scene still has active servers hosting fast-paced multiplayer matches today. Even better, Unreal Tournament 2004 installs and runs like a champion on modern Windows, and I've got 34 4K screenshots to prove it.

The Elder Scrolls Online screenshots: maxed settings at 7680x1440 on LPC

Cory Banks at

The Elder Scrolls Online is currently live for those who preordered, and what better way to celebrate than with ridiculous screenshots from the Large Pixel Collider? We took a trip through Tamriel that spanned three 1440p monitors, using the LPC's four Nvidia GTX Titans to take some gorgeous panorama shots from the game. Here are some of our favorites.

How we capture 4K screenshots and video on the Large Pixel Collider

PC Gamer at

Wes and Tyler reveal the secrets of how they record ludicrously high resolution video and screenshots on the Large Pixel Collider.


The mouse of the Large Pixel Collider

Evan Lahti at

We've picked a mouse worthy of plugging into our $10,000 super-rig, the Large Pixel Collider.


Thief Gold: 3840x2160 screenshots from the LPC

Wes Fenlon at

Thief is back. We've played the reboot from Eidos Montreal and seen what Thief looks like in 2014. But what does the original Thief, released in 1998, look like today? We decided to find out.

With the right mod installed, a modern PC can easily run the classic 1999 version of Thief, Thief Gold, at 1080p. But we played Thief Gold on the Large Pixel Collider, which is never satisfied with 1080p. The LPC worked its pixel-pushing magic to render Thief at 3840x2160, and we took a ton of screenshots along the way. This is The City sharper and higher-res than you've ever seen it before.


Thief gameplay video: maxed settings at 2560x1440 on LPC

PC Gamer at

The Large Pixel Collider—our "ridiculously overpowered because we can" super machine—considered mining Bitcoin for a while, but with that mountain crumbling, it's taken to indiscriminately swiping shiny objects in Thief. We sneaked into its clock tower lair to capture some video at 1440p with the settings cranked as high as they go.