livestreaming

Amazon buys Twitch: 9 ways it can be a better platform for PC gamers

Evan Lahti at

Amazon bought Twitch for $970 million on Monday, a surprise acquisition after the rumor that Google was pursuing Twitch for a similar sum. It’s tough to predict how the purchase will change how we broadcast and spectate PC games, or how Amazon will fold the world’s biggest livestreaming service into its existing media and referral services. But to expect Amazon’s acquisition to have no impact on Twitch is unrealistic.

“We’re keeping most everything the same,” Twitch’s CEO Emmett Shear writes in a post announcing the sale of his company. In a separate press release, Shear says that Amazon ownership will allow it to “create tools and services faster than we could have independently.” As users and casters ourselves on Twitch, here’s a wish list (an Amazon Wish List, perhaps) of the new features we’re interested in seeing and the aspects of Twitch we’d like to remain in tact.

Google reportedly buying Twitch for $1 billion

Andy Chalk at

According to VentureBeat sources "familiar with the matter," Google has wrapped up a purchase of streaming site Twitch in a $1 billion deal estimated to be worth roughly $1 billion.


The future of PC gaming: eSports, livestreaming, and fiber Internet

PC Gamer at

All week long, we're peering ahead to what the future holds for the PC gaming industry. Not just the hardware and software in our rigs, but how and where we use them, and how they impact the games we play. Here's part two of our five-part series; stay tuned all week for more from the future of PC gaming.

The future of PC gaming is online. So is the present, actually—Twitch livestreams and massive League of Legends tournaments are already integral pieces of the PC gaming community. As the audiences for livestreams and eSports surge over the next few years, our broadband infrastructure's going to be hard-pressed to keep up. Here's our look at what the future holds for online gaming: bigger and better eSports, the culture of livestreaming, and the slow spread of fiber Internet that could hold us back from our gigabit dreams.

Watch Cory's Hearthstone Arena run at 5 p.m. PST (It's over!)

Cory Banks at

Update: Thanks for watching, everyone! If you missed Cory's triumph and tragedy, we've embedded the video here.

Hearthstone is a fantastic digital card game, and Arena is its best mode—build a deck from a random draft of cards and see how many wins you can rack up against players with similarly randomized decks. The better you do, the bigger your reward.

If you need proof (or just want to heckle him) Cory will start a Hearthstone Arena run at 5pm PT (8pm ET) live on the PC Gamer Twitch channel. Watch him build his deck, take it into battle, and choose the wrong card every single time. It'll be fun!


See the Arma 3 beta video during two livestreaming events starting tomorrow

Ian Birnbaum at

One of our most hotly anticipated games of this year, Arma 3, will be showing off in a big way this weekend with a livestreaming event straight from Prague. Though the newest version of everyone’s favorite military sim franchise is still in alpha, the beta build of the game will be on full display on Saturday, June 1, and again next Saturday, June 8.


Twitch announces record-breaking month; attracts 28 million viewers

Phil Savage at

Twitch.TV, much like YouTube, now occupies a space in my internet life where I can sort of remember it not existing, but can't really conceive of it not being around. That it was launched less than two years seems like scary time-distorting magic. And given the record breaking growth that Twitch has now announced, it seems I'm not alone in obsessive digestion of gaming streams, competitions and oddities. In fact, last month, 600,000 broadcasters attracted over 28 million unique viewers.

How to stream games with Open Broadcaster: a fast, free livestreaming application

Tyler Wilde at

Video streaming apps are often expensive, not very good, or both expensive and not very good. Enter Open Broadcaster Software, a free, open-source solution which is super lightweight, includes many of the same options as software you can buy, and so far works beautifully for streaming games on Twitch.tv.