LG

EA's Hilleman states "gaming isn't mass market yet," offers opinions on fragmented marketplace

Chris Barylick at

Following an hour-long talk at the TV Connect conference in the United Kingdom, EA CCO Richard Hilleman gave his audience a lot to think about, as noted by GamesIndustry. Opining that and opined that "gaming isn't mass market yet," Hilleman outlined the concerns that need to be addressed before connected TVs can, in his mind, be seen as a top-tier gaming platform.


Ultra-widescreen: can 21:9 be a new standard for gaming?

Dave James at

Do you long for a monitor that eclipses your entire peripheral vision, or is the dominant 16:9 ratio quite wide enough? Manufacturers like NEC, LG and Phillips are giving us the choice with ultra-widescreen 21:9 monitors like the one above. This super-wide, 2560x1080 resolution gives one hell of an increased field of view, but is it something we really want to put our graphics cards through?

The world of the PC monitor has been a strange old place over the last few years. We were all very happy with 16:10 widescreen monitors, then the consoles came along and suddenly everyone wanted the HD res of 1080p. Almost overnight we lost our screen space. The vertical resolution of our 1900x1200 PC monitors were chopped down to just 1080 lines.


Hard Stuff: LG Flatron D2342P Passive 3D Monitor review

Seamus Bellamy at

Good news! LG’s Flatron D2342P monitor allows for 3D gaming on the cheap! That said, the 3D experience it offers is, well, kind of cheap.

The D2342P looks great on paper: it’s got a tasty 23-inch serving of 1080p-capable 3D gaming and movie glory. And with sleek lines, a glossy piano-black bezel, and matching stand, it looks even better when it’s assembled and sitting on your desk. Sadly, looks aren’t everything, and once you get past this beauty’s aesthetics, there’s not a lot left to love.


Coming right out of the screen: LG's glasses free 3D monitor

Adam Oxford at

We've seen a couple of announcements about glasses free 3D laptops from ASUS and Toshiba, but LG has gone one better and produced a lenticular display for the desktop.

The D2000 is a 20inch screen with uses a similar technology to Toshiba's Qosmio F750 3D. There's a built in web came which tracks the position of your eyes, and adjusts the stereoscopic screen filter to the best position for a clear image. The result should be better than wearing passive 3D glasses, with less blurring around the edge of objects, but possibly not as good as using an active shutter system.

There is one massive downside. The D2000 will be launching in Korea with a price equivalent to $1,200, or £750. That's a lot of money for only one extra dimension - you can almost buy a TARDIS for that.