GeForce

Nvidia rumored to be working on new PC-streaming Android box

Andy Chalk at

Nvidia is reportedly taking another run at the living room with a device that will bring PC games to HD televisions through the company's GeForce Experience technology. The device will also run Android software and make use of a "budget-priced separate controller," suggesting that it might actually be positioned as an all-in-one box meant to compete with both Steam in-home streaming and Ouya at the same time.


Nvidia have gone a bit Mantle with their latest GeForce driver release

Dave James at

The green side of the graphics card divide are today releasing a new driver that aims to grab a little more gaming performance back for their GPUs. They’re doing it in much the same way AMD’s proprietary Mantle API is boosting things for the red team.

The new release, named 337.50, is available today, and has been designed to make the existing DirectX 11 API much more efficient for Nvidia graphics cards. They are doing this by reducing the CPU overhead that the driver and API generate, which in turn means you get all the performance your graphics card can muster without being hobbled by DirectX distracting your CPU.


Beyond Maxwell: Nvidia announce their next next-gen Pascal GPU

Dave James at

Nvidia's GPU Technology Conference keynote was full of announcements this week. In addition to revealing the $3000 Titan Z, CEO Jen-Hsun Huang updated Nvidia's graphics architecture roadmap with a first look at the Pascal GPU.


The GTX Titan Z: $1000 more than two Titan Blacks, and probably slower

Dave James at

Because lots of people paid serious money to buy up all the GTX Titans Nvidia could make, they've decided to push things further. The twin-GPU GTX Titan Z is a $3,000 graphics card announced at the GPU Technology Conference (GTC) in San Jose. According to Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang it exists simply because “the market just wanted so much more performance,” but is it really worth all that money?


Nvidia 800M series steals world's fastest notebook GPU crown from Nvidia, says Nvidia

Tim Clark at

Good news from Nvidia for fans of warm thighs on long trips. From today the graphics card behemoth is planning a renewed assault on the gaming notebook market with its forthcoming range of GeForce GTX 800M GPUs, with extended battery life billed as a key feature alongside the (expected) annual performance improvements. PC Gamer recently attended a launch briefing for the 800M series, of which the most powerful variant is the 880M (pictured) which Nvidia claims is the world’s fastest notebook GPU. You can expect the chips to begin appearing in notebooks immediately, and among those to include the 880M at launch are the Alienware 17, Asus G750JZ and MSI GT 70.


Nvidia GTX Titan Black announced, designed to be Nvidia's new fastest card

Dave James at

Did you find yourself yawning at the idea of a new budget-priced GTX 750 Ti yesterday? If you're looking at the top end of the market, Nvidia's GeForce GTX Titan Black might suit. Their new premium card is designed to oust the Titan, and can be yours for the hefty asking cost of £785.


Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti review

Dave James at

The GeForce GTX 750 Ti is an Nvidia first, in many ways. It's built around the new Maxwell GPU architecture, and I reckon it’s also the first time Nvidia have released a new graphics design without launching a top-end iteration first. The GTX 750 Ti may still be rocking the same 700 series badge, but it's a new generation of graphics silicon.

The GTX 750 Ti is a reasonably priced graphics card - at £115 / $150 it’s designed to sit in the volume end of the market and offer an upgrade to as wide an audience as possible. Thanks to its new design it actually spreads the net far wider than previous cards at the same price.


AMD and Nvidia's new budget cards do battle this week

Dave James at

There's a big showdown happening in the world of affordable graphics cards this week. AMD and Nvidia are releasing the latest editions in their £100 / $150 range, an important battleground, given that cards at that range easily outsell their flashy flagship $1000 tech. AMD are bringing some rebranded and boosted versions of their last-gen GPUs to compete with Nvidia's GTX 750Ti and GTX 750, which will give us our first look at their new Maxwell GPU architecture.


Nvidia's Maxwell GPU on its way, but no GTX 800s yet

Dave James at

Nvidia is launching a couple of brand new graphics cards in the entry-level arena. Normally that wouldn’t be a particularly exciting event, but this is going to be our first taste of Nvidia’s new Maxwell GPU architecture. It'll be the first time Nvidia have launched new graphics architecture without housing it in a top-end graphics card. You could argue that’s because they simply don’t need to with the likes of the GTX 780 Ti delivering the goods against the hot and hungry Radeon 290X.


Asus announces Poseidon GTX 780, with hybrid air and water cooling

Dave James at

Asus are planning to expand their Republic of Gamers line-up with two new high-end Nvidia cards - The Poseidon GTX 780 and the GTX 780 Ti DirectCU II. The Poseidon will add a hybrid cooling solution to the GK 110 GPU at the core of the standard GTX 780.


Go small or go home - Nvidia looks to push the Art of Gaming mini-PCs

Dave James at

As the world and their virtual wives get all giddy about a couple of new AMD-based mini-PCs from Sony and Microsoft, Nvidia has set themselves up to compete with the new console generation for the Christmas holidays. In partnership with a bunch of system building folk Nvidia wants to push small form factor gaming PCs, with serious graphics power, into the mainstream. It's called the Art of Gaming.

DinoPC’s Mini Ultimate is one such system and, while the £1,500 sticker price is more expensive than three new consoles together, it’s a mighty fine gaming rig for the money. This is a seriously high-end machine in a snug little chassis.


Nvidia GTX 780 Ti: what do we expect to see?

Dave James at

Nvidia announced they’re hoping to spoil the AMD party by dropping a bomb on the gathered press out in Montreal last week: the GeForce GTX 780 Ti. If the rumours are true and the incoming AMD Radeon R9-290X can beat a GTX Titan in a stand up gaming fight then Nvidia are going to need some sort of riposte. But what exactly?


AMD have repeatedly assured the public the brand new Radeon R9-290X is going to be released this month and there’s not a long time left in October. That’s coming soon and I don’t reckon the new GTX 780 Ti is going to be far behind.

Nvidia unveils GeForce GTX 780 Ti

Tyler Wilde at

Nvidia is making big announcements in Montreal today. We've got G-Sync, which flips the V-sync idea on its head and synchronizes monitor refresh rates to GPU output; recording and Twitch streaming features coming to GeForce Experience; and finally, the hardware: the GeForce GTX 780 Ti.


Goodbye, V-sync! Nvidia G-Sync synchronizes monitor refresh rates with GPU render rates

Tyler Wilde at

The standard display refresh rate is 60Hz—that's 60 images per second—but fancy GPUs can render way more than 60 frames per second. We like more frames. More frames means more responsive input—and screw compromise!—but when out-of-sync rendering traps multiple frames in a single refresh, the Horrible One emerges: screen tearing. The best we can do now is tame the beast with V-sync, but in Montreal today, Nvidia unsheathed a new weapon which it claims will put tearing and stuttering down for good.


Call of Duty: Ghosts system requirements posted by Nvidia

Michael Jones at

Update: Well, that didn't take long. Activision's support Twitter account has just confirmed that these specs are not official. Original story follows inside.

While it's not official, the likely PC requirements for Call of Duty: Ghosts have been posted on Nvidia's website. The minimum requirements are pretty friendly to those without giant rigs, but a slight step up from previous CoDs given the transition to new console hardware.

Nvidia GeForce 314.22 drivers boost BioShock Infinite, Tomb Raider performance

Omri Petitte at

As it typically does for a major game launch, Nvidia has updated its GeForce card drivers to 314.22 for boosts in performance and stability. It claims recent titans BioShock Infinite and Tomb Raider both get a significant bump in frames-per-second, with the former increasing by 41 percent and the latter by an astonishing 71 percent.


Tomb Raider's GeForce performance issues being looked at by Nvidia and Crystal Dynamics

Phil Savage at

Nvidia released a new beta version of their GeForce driver this week, once again squeezing more incremental improvements from a bunch of games, both new and old. But one prominent release was missing from the list of tweaks: Tomb Raider. Lara's latest outing may continue Square Enix's quality porting form, but, as Chris notes in his settings overview, GeForce cards attempting to use AMD's new fancy hair tech TressFX suffer a drastic performance hit.


Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan review

Dave James at

When I first saw the Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan a couple weeks before launch Nvidia’s Tom Petersen explained that it was their “love story to gamers. It looks great, it sounds great and it has great performance.” And while he is right on pretty much all fronts, the GTX Titan is likely to only ever be a matter of unrequited love for all but a tiny percentage of PC gamers. When you price up a single graphics card at the same price as a performance gaming PC, that’s immediately most of your audience cut out.

So what is it? This is the fastest single-GPU graphics card on the planet and the very top-end of Nvidia’s Kepler architecture. We knew when the GTX 680 launched that it wasn’t home to the full-fat Kepler core - that was held over for the Tesla range of professional graphics cards, which need the amount of double precision compute performance the top GK110 GPU affords.


Nvidia unveil the GTX Titan. An elegant weapon for a more civilised age.

Dave James at

Anyone remember Cray unveiling their new Titan supercomputer at the tail-end of last year? Y'know, that vast data-munching machine housing 18688 of Nvidia’s Tesla K20 graphics cards, each of which go for around £2500/$3500. I remember looking down mournfully at the GTX 680 in my test rig and thinking “wouldn’t it be nice to have just one of those graphics cards?”

Well, now you can.

Nvidia has re-engineered the GK110 GPU that sits at the heart of the professional Tesla cards and stuck it in a gaming-focused desktop boards. Thus, the GTX Titan is born.


GeForce Experience: hands-on with Nvidia's optimisation tool-kit

Dave James at

GeForce Experience is an application that recommends the optimal settings for any game in its database for your exact configuration of hardware. I’ve been chasing Nvidia for months trying to secure access and finally the closed beta has arrived.

It only works on Nvidia graphics drivers, and only then with the cards from the 400 series Fermi-based cards onwards. But it does take into account your motherboard, CPU and memory settings too. It’s an incredibly simple-to-use bit of kit and I think it could become an essential part of any GeForce gamer's software suites.