Featured

World of Warcraft: Warlords of Draenor coming in November

Andy Chalk at

With some spectacular cinematic sequences, Blizzard has revealed the launch date for World of Warcraft: Warlords of Draenor.


PC gamers have to fight for PC gaming, and Metal Gear Solid V is a big win

Tyler Wilde at

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is releasing on PC, and that’s great news. Rise of the Tomb Raider isn’t releasing on PC, not right away, at least, and that’s not so great. But what it does mean is that console manufacturers see us as competition, and we’re doing pretty well. We attracted a massive game with MGSV, and we’re scary enough that Microsoft has gobbled up Tomb Raider for the Xbox.


Hearthstone Help: Top 10 new Naxxramas card combos

PC Gamer at

In this week's Hearthstone column our resident Legendary player is back to list his favorite combos enabled by the new Naxx cards. Because hey, who doesn't want to live the double Thaddius dream, right?


Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain and Ground Zeroes confirmed for PC [Updated]

Tyler Wilde at

According to a headline on Konami's official site, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain and Ground Zeroes will release on Steam. It says exactly that: "Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain And Ground Zeroes Coming To Steam." On the other side of the link is a 404 page, but we expect the announcement to be made during Konami's livestream in about 30 minutes (11 a.m. PDT, 2 p.m. EDT, 7 p.m. BST).


The 4 best free image editing tools on PC for screenshots and gifs

PC Gamer at

At PC Gamer, our screenshots folders are constantly full to bursting with screens of whatever game we're currently playing. When it comes time to edit them, we usually use Photoshop—but sometimes there's a better piece of software out there for dealing with images that's lighter and faster and cheaper (read: free) than Photoshop. Our colleagues at TechRadar recently rounded up the best free image editing software, and we've listed the ones we like to use below. These are our favorite utilities for making gifs, batch editing tons of screenshots, and making simple, quick edits that don't need the power of Photoshop.


Back to Baldur's Gate: revisiting BioWare's legendary RPG

Andy Kelly at

Baldur’s Gate was one of my formative PC gaming experiences. I have vivid memories of sitting in the glow of my old CRT monitor on a Friday evening after school, dungeon crawling until the sun rose. I’ve never been one for misty-eyed nostalgia, but last week I felt compelled to reinstall it. It was almost midnight, and I had work the next day, but I didn’t think I’d be playing for long. Just enough to sate my nostalgia. Three hours later and I was still up. Its claws are in me again—almost 16 years after I first installed it on my old beige Pentium II—and, surprisingly, it still holds up.


Risen 3: Titan Lords review

Leif Johnson at

Piranha Bytes knows you probably didn't like Risen 2, and so the studio symbolically kills it off but 30 minutes into the sequel. There's our hero from 2012's pirate-themed adventure, still nameless after all these years and looking as though he just wandered off the set of Assassin's Creed IV. But piracy apparently isn't what you want, and so he dies in front of a glowing portal in a ruin without so much as a last "Arr."


4K Screenshot Showcase: Borderlands 2

Ben Griffin at

Every week, keen screen-grabber Ben Griffin brings you a sumptuous 4K resolution gallery to celebrate PC gaming's prettiest places.

Famously, Gearbox changed Borderlands' visuals at the eleventh hour, completely re-doing the character models and textures to turn it from an ugly caterpillar into a bazooka-firing butterfly dipped in a vat of leaky glowsticks. Gearbox further loosened their belt for the sequel. They continue the first game's cel-shaded mania but notch up the environmental variety, with arctic wastes, gleaming metropolises, bone-dry dust bowls, and green goo-filled mines. It makes for a game that delivers plenty of spectacle.

Football Manager player database to be used by real-world clubs

Phil Savage at

If you're a long-term Football Manager player, you likely believe yourself to be a fully qualified managerial master. At the same time, a nagging part of your brain is probably reminding you that it's all fiction, that you haven't taken Accrington Stanley to League Cup success, and that, if given the chance in real life, everybody would point and laugh at you.

Maybe it's time to silence that pessimistic voice, because the game's extensive player database has been deemed accurate enough for real-world use. Sports Interactive have today announced a partnership with performance analysis provider Prozone Sports that will put the FM database at the disposal of real-world clubs and scouts.


Mod of the Week: Double Action Boogaloo, for Half-Life 2

Christopher Livingston at

Amidst a flock of startled doves I dive left, my dual pistols blazing, and take down one enemy as another evades me by back-flipping off a wall. As I empty both clips, my dive becomes a prolonged sideways slide which takes me right off the roof of the skyscraper. I'm not alone: another thug sails over the ledge and joins me on my long plummet to the ground. While falling, I reload both guns and we trade fire all the way down to the street. Did I mention this happens in slow-motion? It's as if Jon Woo directed The Matrix when you play Double Action Boogaloo, a multiplayer mod for Half-Life 2.


Dominions 4 diary part three: wizards, lizards and eternal darkness

Tom Senior at

In parts one and two, Balboa, my obelisk god, leader of the Lanka, successfully fended off challenges from other pretender gods in the west of the kingdom, and plans to turn his attentions south once those enemies have been defeated.

Lizards. Lizards everywhere. The cold-blooded bastards have crossed the southern river to strike at my exposed heartlands. Far to the west, my armies continue to decimate the gods that challenged me last month, but it’ll take them ages to double back and help my central cities. This could mean trouble. Big, scaly trouble.

The Best Free Games of the Week

Tom Sykes at

This week's free games picks take you to the Mountains of Madness, deepest space, the rugged Old West, and down, down, down into an ancient temple. If your canteen is full, your quiver is stuffed with arrows, and your knapsack is fit to bursting with essential Curly Wurlys and Snickers bars, you may join me after the break.


Saturday Crapshoot: Haunted Casino

Richard Cobbett at

Every week, Richard Cobbett rolls the dice to bring you an obscure slice of gaming history, from lost gems to weapons grade atrocities. This week, when the crypt goes creak, and the tombstones quake, spooks come out for a swinging wake. Happy haunts materialise, and begin to... play video poker?

So, here's an interesting little curiosity for you. Since pretty much the dawn of the PC, there's been a game called Last Half Of Darkness - an early horror adventure that, much like Last of the Summer Wine, has an interesting concept of 'Last'. The first one came out in 1989, and while there haven't been that many sequels, they kept coming until 2011 - Last Half of Darkness II and II, Last Half of Darkness: Shadows of the Servants, Last Half Of Darkness: Tomb of Zojir and Last Half Of Darkness: Seriously, Someone Turn The Lights On. In the middle of all that darkness though, another lesser known game was released - a freebie at the time. But can ghosts and ghouls gamble with the best of them?

The best living room PC games to play on the couch

Wes Fenlon at

Every so often, PC gamers want to step away from the desk and play some games in the living room. There's a comfy couch! And a big TV! While we'd never want to give up our trusty keyboard and mouse for Counter-Strike or Civilization, there are tons of great PC games—both multiplayer and singleplayer—that are ideally suited to a controller and a big TV. We've assembled a list of the 20 best PC games for the living room right now, from modern multiplayer classics (Towerfall! Nidhogg!) to sprawling adventures like Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag, built with controllers in mind.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

PC Gamer at

Each week PC Gamer’s poets in residence gather their thoughts on the previous seven days. Weirdly, it never seems to rhyme.

The PC Gamer Show episode 3: Videoball, GTA 4 no-friction and more on LPC Jr., Arma 3 Zeus mode

PC Gamer at

It's The PC Gamer Show! In episode three we're introducing the new Large Pixel Collider Jr. with an afternoon of special living room gaming challenges. Can Counter-Strike maven Evan Lahti win when he's forced to play with an Xbox controller? Who will survive the frictionless mayhem of GTA 4's Carmageddon mod? Plus, we play upcoming electronic sport Videoball, and PC Gamer UK walks us through ARMA 3's awesome Zeus mode.


We built the Large Pixel Collider Jr., an insane gaming PC for the living room

Evan Lahti at

We love building PCs. Last year, we set out to assemble the most irresponsible gaming rig imaginable, and we called it the Large Pixel Collider. Over the past nine months, we’ve spent a ton of time writing stories, making videos, and playing around with our absurd, $10,000 computer.

But as Valve’s incursion into the living room started taking shape this year, we wondered: what if we could build an equally ridiculous but smaller PC suited for playing games on a couch?


Three Lane Highway: there are many Dotas, and other thoughts on custom game modes

Chris Thursten at

Three Lane Highway is Chris' weekly column about Dota 2.

Dota 2's popularity goes against all of the received wisdom about game design I can think of. It is complicated and inconsistent and it pushes people to interact in a way that generates all sorts of well-documented discontent. What it offers can't be summed up in a single sentence, and even a documentary dedicated to explaining its competitive side can only do so much to explain what you actually do in the game, or why that is fun.

Source 2 tools teased in Dota 2 update

Tom Senior at

The Dota 2 Workshop update is even more interesting than it first appears. The new tools include an overhauled edition of Valve's Hammer level editor, and the update download adds a 64-bit build of Dota 2. Both contain allusions to the next generation of Valve's Source engine. Set the Half-Life 3 alert to DEFCON beige.


Dota 2 modding tools now in alpha, upload custom maps/modes to Steam Workshop

Tom Sykes at

Valve has announced, and released, the first alpha version of its Dota 2 Workshop Tools, which will make it easier for modders to make and share custom maps and game modes for their gargantuan wizard-'em-up. This initial release is focused around developers, so the system requirements might be a tad high: you'll need a 64-bit version of Windows, a Direct3D 11 compatible GPU, and you'll need to opt into the Steam Client Beta. If you have all those things, you can now use the tools to alter Dota 2 to your liking, uploading the results to the Steam Workshop for other players to try.