Eidos Montreal

4K Screenshot Showcase: Thief

Ben Griffin at

Every week, keen screen-grabber Ben Griffin brings you a sumptuous 4K resolution gallery to celebrate PC gaming's prettiest places.

Say what you will about the game itself, but Thief's setting is as evocative as they come. Known simply as The City, this moody hub is equal parts Victorian Gothic and supernatural steampunk, sporadically illuminated by the light leaking from clouded windows and drowning in low-hanging mist.

There's little respite from the blue-black colour scheme besides the seedy rouge decor in the House of Blossoms and warmer tones of the Baron's manor, but that's what makes it so oppressive: it's always night, and it's nearly always raining. I actually took 40 shots in all, so if you'd like to see the ones not linked below, click here.

Deus Ex: The Fall review

Andy Kelly at

I played The Fall on a tablet and thought it was pretty good. It did a solid job of translating Human Revolution to a mobile platform, at the expense of some complexity. But on PC it’s like watching a 240p YouTube video on an IMAX screen.

Its mobile roots are obvious, from the tiny environments, blurry textures and low-poly character models, to the on-screen prompts, which use the old touchscreen icons. It’s an unforgivably half-arsed port.


Deus Ex: Mankind Divided trademark filed, hopefully won't be another mobile game

Tom Sykes at

We never asked for this reportedly shoddy PC port of the Deus Ex mobile game The Fall. We never asked for this impressive Human Revolution short fan film, but we're glad it got made anyway. We also never asked for this Deus Ex expanded universe thingy, but we'll be glad when it results in another PC game as good as HR. That day may be sooner than we thought, if a recent filed trademark is anything to go by. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is its name, and there is a modicum of evidence to suggest it may be a proper HR sequel, rather than another mobile game. We never asked you to join us after the break.


Thief speedrunner shows what it takes to get a top score

Patrick Carlson at

Speedrunning a game like the new Thief sometimes means knowing when to slow down. Youtuber prenatual has set a pretty high standard with the complete playthrough documented above, a two-hour, 1300-point custom speedrun with no kills, alerts, or knockouts.


Now playing: watch Chris start his Thief Iron Man playthrough

Tom Senior at

Thief has a brilliant options menu. Visual aids like loot-glint, objective markers and object highlighting can be disabled for a score multiplier. You can even turn off Garrett's new "focus" mode, and guard alert indicators, and then turn the whole thing into a sneaky roguelike by activating Iron Man mode. Die, or fail an objective, and the whole run comes to an end. Sounds like a perfect challenge for our Thief reviewer, Chris Thursten, who streamed the start of his Iron Man adventure last night. How did he get on? The video is here.


Deus Ex: The Fall announced for PC release

Phil Savage at

Square Enix have announced that mobile game Deus Ex: The Fall is being re-released on Steam in a new and reworked PC edition, to be released on March 25th. Did anyone ask for this? Probably, because The Fall was supposedly a competent if somewhat unremarkable extension of the atmosphere and ideas of Human Revolution. As you'd hope from a PC port, the game has been augmented to support keyboard, mouse and controller. The mobile version's in-app purchase options have also been removed.


Thief review

Chris Thursten at

Thief – the series – has been many things. It is the grandfather of stealth on the PC, part of a design heritage that links Quake to System Shock 2, System Shock 2 to Deus Ex, and so on. It stands for the idea that ‘first person’ doesn’t imply ‘shooter’: the original BioShock might be its great-grandchild, but Amnesia and Gone Home are Thief’s descendents too.

It is the actualisation of a very specific fantasy – the outlaw shadow, Robin Hood by way of Batman – and more broadly representative of a particular type of fantasy, a gothic marriage of Hexen’s para-medieval grotesquerie and ’90s-era steampunk. For some players, Thief is about precision – perfect sequences of evasion and distraction forged with much hammering of the quick load key. For others, it’s a game of improvisation, gambits, brawls and hair’s breadth escapes.

For many, it’s about atmosphere. The sense of being an intruder. The latent threat of an Auldale mansion at night, the mysteries of an underground city, the terrors of The Cradle. Thief’s settings are a showcase for exemplary art and level design talent, a legacy that begins with Looking Glass Studios and ends with The Dark Mod, with the gaming community.


Thief launch trailer tries to capture your attention

Phil Savage at

I'd forgotten Thief was being released next week. In fact, you could say its launch really snuck up on me. At least, you could if you didn't want everyone within earshot to groan, sign and throw heavy objects of you. Instead, it's probably best to keep quiet and watch this launch trailer, which goes over some of the plot points that are motivating Garrett as he robs his way through a city in turmoil.


Thief video sees Garrett sneak and steal in a full mission playthrough

Patrick Carlson at

We know Garrett feels right at home in dark places. In advance of Thief's launch later this month, Eidos Montreal has released a complete mission playthrough video that shines a light on a few of the dim alleys and dangerous perches that will populate the upcoming reboot to the classic series.


Thief trailer explains the game in exhaustive detail

Phil Savage at

Thief is a game about a thief. Not just any thief either, but a master thief. That means he's silent, untraceable, and likely has permanent spinal damage from all that time spent crouching. All of which (well, except maybe the back injuries) are in direct opposition to the development of Thief, which has been loud enough to rouse the elderly statesmen whose jewellery box you've been rifling through.

Case in point: the new trailer, which takes six minutes to fully detail almost every aspect of how the game plays. Criminals would normally need a Crimewatch episode to get that sort of exposure.


Thief system requirements released - how good a PC will you need to steal?

Tom Sykes at

The new Thief game is coming out soon, and if you're rocking an oldish PC you're probably wondering whether or not you'll be able to play it. If only there was some way to judge whether your Pentium 4 with 128mb ram and integrated graphics will be able to run Garrett's latest pilfery adventure. Good news: there is. Bad news: your Pentium would be lucky to run to the end of the street. Eidos Montreal have revealed the game's system requirements, which I've stashed beneath the break.


Thief difficulty settings dare you to be an "Iron Man"

Patrick Carlson at

What kind of burglar do you want to be? That's the question the upcoming Thief reboot is going to be posing to both new and veteran players of the stealth series. The level of difficulty and UI customization being built into the game should allow for some brutally precarious attempts, according to a new interview with Thief's lead game designer Alexandre Breault.


Thief graphics technology detailed, makes use of "heavily modified" Unreal Engine 3

Patrick Carlson at

A sly thief like Garrett needs the darkest shadows he can find. Thankfully, the team behind the upcoming Thief reboot has its sights set on cranking up the PC edition's visuals—shadows and all—according to an interview with Eidos Montreal's technical art director Jean-Normand Bucci at Dark Side of Gaming.


Thief no longer has QTEs, does still contain customisable UI

Phil Savage at

In the spirit of the latest Thief news, this post contains QTEs. Please press the indicated key at the specified time, or you will die. Well, you might die. Okay, you probably won't die.

As part of Eidos Montreal's latest Thief community Q&A, lead level designer Daniel Windfeld Schmidt revealed that [PRESS 'X' TO NOT DIE] the QTEs present in the previous press demo had been removed, along with all other traces of arbitrary quick-time avoidance. According to Schmidt, such button bashing was only a minor part of the game, and thus there removal became an easy decision once fans had voiced concern over their inclusion.


Thief trailer tells the story of The City, via Garrett's behatted fence Basso

Tom Sykes at

Thief, eh? I think it's fair to say we're all a bit worried about the direction it's heading down, particularly when it's on track to creep out of the shadows and cosh us on the head as soon as February. Does this artistic, atmospheric, sadly gameplay-free trailer ease any of our fears? Nope, but it does describe The City in some fancy-pancy words, providing some backstory for Garrett's magnificently behatted fence Basso in the process.

Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut out now, available as cheap upgrade for HR owners

Tom Senior at

The Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut does seem to be a matter of pride for Eidos Montreal. Director's Cut builds are a common way to offer new players a jumping-on point long after launch, but few redesign sections of the original game to account for fan feedback. When it comes to Deus Ex: Human Revolution's boss fights, the negative feedback was loud and unanimous. They've been reworked with new level geometry to allow for multiple approaches, thank goodness.


Possible Deus Ex casting call seeks new members for the Illuminati

Michael Jones at

Eidos ditches new XP system for Thief reboot

Michael Jones at

Mountains of lofty expectations and nostalgia-drenched skepticism fell upon the Thief reboot as soon as it was unveiled. Eidos Montreal's upcoming stealth-em-up will attempt to revitalize the lauded PC franchise that last saw an entry in 2004. So far, Tom is among the skeptical due to various deviations from the classic games, among other problems. However, one of the design elements not part of the original series will no longer be present in this iteration.


Britain's most read paper reckons Deus Ex: Human Revolution cybernetic eyeball is real

Tom Senior at

UK newspaper, The Sun, have included fictional Sarif Industries cyborg eyeball tech in a roundup of "AMAZING GADGETS JUST AROUND CORNER". Such technology, they say, "is in its infancy now" but "will be commonplace to our grandkids."

When we spotted a tweet about the article from Good Gaming about the article I had to nip to the local corner shop to see it. Here it is. Page 28, item five in the feature, today's finest facepalm from Britain's most popular paper.


Deus Ex: Human Revolution - Director's Cut pricing announced, is cheaper if you already own the game

Phil Savage at

Deus Ex: Human Revolution's Director's Cut will be with us in just under two weeks, and it sounds like a significant augmentation to the game. But one thing Square Enix had kept hidden away in their top secret HQ was how much it would cost for people who already owned the original version. Worryingly, we didn't even know if there would be any concessions to early adopters. Now we do, and there will.