Mod of the Week: Pilot Civilian Air Rescue, for ArmA 3

Christopher Livingston at

ArmA 3 is a challenging game to learn, especially so when it comes to piloting choppers. Enter the Pilot Civilian Air Rescue mod, which features a number of single-player Mohawk chopper missions, from insertion (transporting doctors to a combat zone), extraction (retrieving injured NPCs and delivering them to a hospital), and even search and rescue, in which you look for lost hikers or downed pilots and ferry them back to safety. It's a great way to hone your chopper flying skills offline while getting a warm and fuzzy feeling from helping NPCs in need.

The Best Free Games of the Week

Tom Sykes at

In honour of Glitch Jam, I've clipped through my floor and I'm currently hurtling into the void beneath the world. Luckily I thought to bring along my laptop for the journey, so I'm able to bring you a few highlights of the jam, mid-hurtle, including super-purple glitch tourism, buggy medieval dungeoneering, and some other stuff that isn't quite so messed up. Now that I've typed the word 'glitch' so much it's beginning to disassociate in my memory, let us begin.


Meridian: New World demo offers a slice of traditional RTS action

Tom Sykes at

You couldn't move for real-time strategy games back in the day, but (Starcraft 2 aside) the genre seems to have fallen by the wayside of late, and it's not entirely clear why. Planetary Annihilation and Meridian: New World are two of the biggest names in what could be a space sim-style renaissance - just as soon as both games are released, naturally. While the former requires a £30 Early Access fee to sample its gigantic galactic tactical action, the relatively humble Meridian now has a demo, in addition to its slightly cheaper Early Access tithe. Yep: Meridian is two rare things all at once: an old-fashioned RTS, with an old-fashioned free playable demo. You can grab it from the website or from its Steam page.


Battlefield 4 Dragon's Teeth releases for Premium July 15th, according to Origin tweet

Tom Sykes at

What are you up to on July 15th? It's a Tuesday, so you're probably going to be either at work or at school for some of it, but EA are rather hoping you'll dedicate part to installing and playing Battlefield 4's new Dragon's Teeth DLC. That's according to a tweet (quickly deleted) by EA's Origin account, which revealed (then quickly unrevealed) that Dragon's Teeth will be out for Premium subscribers on that particular date. If true, then we only need to apply EA and DICE's usual two-week delay for non-Premium members to surmise that Dragon's Teeth will launch for everyone on July 29th. That tweet/untweet is after the break, along with a reminder of what the map pack actually involves.


Saturday Crapshoot: Liberty Or Death

Richard Cobbett at

Every week, Richard Cobbett rolls the dice to bring you an obscure slice of gaming history, from lost gems to weapons grade atrocities. This week, give me Liberty or... wait, hang on. Being British, that would be most unpatriotic. Dispense Oppression AND Death, and give me a nice cup of tea and a biscuit!

The Glorious Campaign Against The Traitor Colonies. Day 1. So far, I don't think anyone has noticed that I have no idea what I'm doing. Splendid. How does one win a war against an entrenched force like this, anyway? I'm assuming that simply building a lot of tanks and rushing them will not work, partly because of the scale of the battlefield and difficulty of establishing the necessary supply chains, but mostly because they haven't been invented yet. I hope that expedition I sent to the Tiber River pans out. An ion cannon would be extremely useful, as well as really setting the appropriate tone for future Independence Days. But I digress. And should probably give some orders beyond "Try to win this."

Ubisoft VP Chris Early says resistance to DLC is in decline

Andy Chalk at

The Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag "Time Saver" packs aren't expensive—$1 for the Collectibles Pack and $2 for the Resources Pack—but it's the principle of the thing that's so outrageous, at least among those who remember that cheat codes used to be free. Yet according to Ubisoft Vice President of Digital Publishing Chris Early, there was no outrage. "There was no resistance," he told GamesIndustry. "Maybe there were 12 guys somewhere who said something, but whatever. As a whole, there wasn't a problem."


PC classic commentary: King's Quest VI with Jane Jensen

Wes Fenlon at

PC Gamer's classic commentaries are special interviews with the developers of some of our favorite games. Join us for an hour with a classic game and the inside stories of its creation.

Zounds! Before legendary adventure game designer Jane Jensen worked on King's Quest VI: Heir Today, Gone Tomorrow, she was, herself, a fan of King's Quest. Jensen and Sierra co-founder Roberta Williams collaborated on King's Quest VI, and Prince Alexander's adventures in the Land of the Green Isles may be the fan favorite of series. Over the course of an hour, Jane Jensen tells stories from the King's Quest's development and her career at Sierra as she plays the game for the first time in 20 years.

Oculus Rift suspends sales to China because of "extreme reselling"

Andy Chalk at

The Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 started shipping this week, but the company has been forced to suspend orders from China because of "extreme reseller purchases." It's now looking into alternative methods for getting the hardware into the hands of legitimate developers, but says it doesn't have a timeline for when that might happen.


Hack 'n' Slash review (Early Access)

Emanuel Maiberg at

Early Access reviews offer our preliminary verdicts on in-development games. We may follow up this unscored review with a final, scored review in the future.

Hack ‘n’ Slash looks like a Zelda game, but it’s a deconstruction, not a tribute. Rather than asking you to figure out how to match your growing inventory of tools to new enemies, dungeons, and bosses, it pokes holes in game design itself, exposing the basic programming that makes the game world and enemies inside it function.

Dieselpunk RPG InSomnia returns to Kickstarter, and it's not an MMO

Andy Chalk at

InSomnia's first go-around with Kickstarter came to an unhappy end in November 2013 when the developer, Studio Mono, pulled the plug after raising a little over $5000 toward a $70,000 goal. Now it's back, with a tweaked campaign, a playable demo and a clear message that it is not an MMO.


Heroes of the Storm trailer explains how to customise abilities with the Talent System

Phil Savage at

Blizzard's upcoming lane-pusher, Heart Heroes Hearth of the Storm Swarm Stone doesn't feature an all-hero item shop. Instead, each character has a 'Talent System', designed to let players customise their build as they advance in level. In the new 'Behind The Nexus' video, Blizzard explain how the system works, and how different combinations can produce a more efficient build—depending on the map.


Dota 2's The International prize pool distribution revealed, newcomer streams promised

Phil Savage at

It's an exciting month for fans of DIGITAL SPORT. We're only a few days away from the start of The International's play-offs and exactly two weeks from the main event. Valve are preparing for the Dota 2 tournament's kick... er, creep-off with the launch of the official International mini-site. With it, they've announced the competition's prize-pool distribution, and the multitude of ways for fans—and newcomers—to watch.


The week's highs and lows in PC gaming

Tim Clark at

Every Friday the PC Gamer enter our custom sensory deprivation tank to recall the best moments and buried memories of the previous seven days.

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive highlights more community maps in Operation: Breakout

Phil Savage at

Where next on the terrorism/counter-terrorism world tour that is Counter-Strike: Global Offensive? Valve have launched Operation: Breakout—the latest in a series of seasonal events for the competitive shooter. This time, the community-created maps that it spotlights are available in official matchmaking to all players.


Octo-core Intel chips incoming this Autumn, priced at $999

Dave James at

Intel is widely expected to be dropping the octo-core Haswell-E bomb in September. The smart money places launch sometime around their Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, but only the most committed enthusiasts will want to put down $999 for Intel's new tech.


Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel video offers primer on lunar combat

Shaun Prescott at

Shooting things on the moon is different to shooting things on Earth-like Pandora. That's the message in this Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel video anyway, which has series villain Handsome Jack describing the basics of lunar gameplay. Anyone familiar with previous Borderlands games will feel at home, but now you can jump really high, which seems to be a prerequisite for first-person shooter games in 2014.


Turtle Rock Studios seeks Evolve alpha testers

Andy Chalk at

Turtle Rock Studios is very quietly seeking participants for an alpha test of its upcoming online shooter Evolve. There are some relatively tight restrictions on who will be let in but if you have a PC that can run the game and live in mainland North America, you might be one of the lucky ones.


The state of Elder Scrolls Online: 3 months after launch

Leif Johnson at

A week after E3, I logged into Elder Scrolls Online expecting the worst. It was a pivotal moment for the future of ESO in the notoriously fickle MMORPG genre—the colorful rival WildStar had gone live but days before, the new "Craglorn" patch was settling into maturity, and most importantly, the first month of subscriptions had run dry for most early adopters. After the barrage of criticisms from critics and bitter players alike, I'd all but convinced myself that mine would be the only name shining on my favorite guild's roster upon entering Tamriel.

I couldn't have been more wrong. I logged in to find almost every player at Veteran Rank 12 rushing to complete one of the new "Trials," and they bugged me about why I hadn't been logging in as though all the factors above weren't into play. I needed that; it gave me hope that the roughly 400 hours I’ve spent with the game to date weren’t for naught, and that other players shared the same begrudging affection for it as I do. The pieces, it seems, are in place to get back on track after a rocky start. ZeniMax has shown some competence so far in delivering an end game that its loyal players want to play, but now the question is whether it can overcome lingering issues with balance, fresh content, and a tedious leveling experience beyond the level cap.


Transformers Universe free-to-play MOBA goes into open beta on July 4

Andy Chalk at

The free-to-play MOBA Transformers Universe is entering open beta tomorrow, which means that players will be able to register and then immediately jump into the giant fighting robot action. Jagex is celebrating the big step this weekend by offering double XP and $75,000 in prizes.


PC classic commentary: Tyrian 2000 with Alexander Brandon

Wes Fenlon at

PC Gamer's classic commentaries are special interviews with the developers of some of our favorite games. Join us for an hour with a classic game and the inside stories of its creation.

Before he composed the music for Jazz Jackrabbit, or Unreal Tournament, or Deus Ex, Alexander Brandon helped design one of the PC's all-time great SHMUPs. That game was Tyrian, which Epic MegaGames published as shareware in 1995. Compared to most Japanese SHMUPs, Tyrian was utterly packed with features—a story mode and an arcade mode, tons of weapons and upgrades, secret levels, secret modes, multiple ships. And at the time, its smooth 2D parallax scrolling was a mini technical marvel. Brandon wrote music for Tyrian, but he also contributed to writing and design. Our hour-long chat is full of stories from the early days of Epic and the 1990s freeware scene.