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The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

You've all played SuperHot, yes? Then we can begin. This week's roundup features a utopian paradise, a very punchy sailor, and a couple of dancing secret agents, among other things. Unless it turns out this was all some sort of daymare, you can join me to hear more after the break.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Continuing last week's theme of games either disappearing or not working by the time I come to try them, I wasn't able to play Cookie Clicker in time for this week's roundup, but I've just had a quick go and it's bloody wonderful in a Candy Box/A Dark Room sorta of way. So play that! But also stick around for another collection of cracking confectionary, which this week is brought to you by the letter, I dunno, Q. Enjoy!


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Self-aware triangles, the thought police, real-time chess – reality is falling apart at the seams in our regular webgame roundup, which this week is brought to you by [OUR GLORIOUS LEADER]. Click on for rebellious isosceles, stacks of minigames, a randomly generated roguey adventure and a revitalised board game classic (not Kerplunk). Enjoy!


A Tale of Two Worlds: a smart puzzle-platformer channelling The Longest Journey and Trine

Tom Sykes at

In this clever student game project from Ahmed Majdoubi and co, you're trapped between the twin worlds of magic and technology - and as everyone knows, those two don't exactly get along. While A Tale of Two Worlds' premise reminds of The Longest Journey, the platforming is pure Trine, all jaunty fairytale music and cube-manhandling. The neat twist is that its two worlds are represented on the screen at the same time; you can even drag the border around with the mouse. AToTW's currently in development, but there's a browser-based alpha version you can play right now. And you should.


The Free Webgame Round-Up

Tom Sykes at

Mankind has finally discovered the Yeti, hiding in the undergrowth of Kongregate – although it isn't quite what we were expecting. The mythological creature spends a lot of time helping worm-things and barely any time posing for out-of-focus photographs on snowy hilltops. Dreams: shattered. Elsewhere this week, get ready to play ccatch, fight punks in the future, and attempt to steer a crash-prone ship around a deadly obstacle course. Enjoy!


Neptune's Pride II: Triton released, promises more strategic scheming in space

Phil Savage at

Good news for fans of galactic conquest, bad news for fans of having and keeping friends: Iron Helmet's real-time multiplayer space strategy Neptune's Pride is back with a sequel. Neptune's Pride II: Triton sports a shiny new HTML5 engine - adding tablet and phone support to the browser-based game - as well as an overhauled UI, and new tech and research options. A short tutorial video explains how these new features can help you to betray anyone you've ever cared about.


Anno Online hands-on preview: the next-generation of browser games?

Andy Hartup at

It’s easy to be impressed and – if I’m honest – a little overwhelmed by Anno Online. I’m staring at a city built by one of the developers at Ubisoft Bluebyte, which he describes as “several weeks worth of playtime” and it’s a sprawling, intensely busy scene as tiny people dash around between myriad buildings, while ships clog up the harbour keen to deliver their goods. There are exclamation points everywhere. Apparently I need to build more vineyards to start wine production, there’s a shortage of goat farms, and some citizens in a far-flung corner of my empire are upset because they don’t have a road to the local market. Aaaaaaargh.


Dune 2: play the strategy classic in your browser now, for free

Andy Hartup at

After 20 years in the desert, Dune 2 is back on PC. Ported from an open-source version of the game, the pioneering RTS – which laid the foundations for games like Starcraft 2, Total War and Command and Conquer - has been faithfully recreated in HTML 5, so you can play it in your browser without handing over a single grain of spice. Or any real money.


The Free Webgame Round-up

Tom Sykes at

Spare a thought for your poor browser tabs, the oft-neglected part of the Internet experience. Do you think your email account wants to rub shoulders with that GIF of a surprised cat, or your ongoing Facebook chat with one of your enemies from school? Best keep them separated with a good old-fashioned webgame, preferably of the 'free' variety. As it happens we've harvested the cream of this week's browser-based crop, and presented them below for your consideration. Read on for fear, gravity, puzzles and swoooords, probably actually in that order.


Aussie web store applies Internet Explorer 7 tax "to help make the internet a better place"

Tom Senior at

With the help of some almost illegible notations passed to me by the PCGamer.com browser analysis badger, I happen to know that roughly 12% of you are using Internet Explorer right now. You might want to consider migrating to another browser if you're using version 7, the BBC report that an Australian online store have started to add an IE7 "tax" charge onto orders made through Microsoft's decrepit browser.

Kogan.com is the store, named after its CEO, Ruslan Kogan. He told the BBC that the store found that while only 3% of customers who used the site visited using IE7, Kogan's IT team were spending a lot of their time making sure the site was compatible with ancient software. "I was constantly on the line to my web team. The amount of work and effort involved in making our website look normal on IE7 equalled the combined time of designing for Chrome, Safari and Firefox," he said.