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    Old 04-06-2012, 09:14 AM
    thequillguy thequillguy is offline
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    Default What do teachers really think about games?

    At another parents(') evening last week (where I tell parents how their children are progressing in English), I had three sets of folks who told me their kids played too many games. Of course, their kids are probably playing too many FPS games, and I tried to direct them towards something else.

    Here's an interesting article on what some teachers think about games in school, in light of a teaching union (albeit the smallest one) saying that there needs to be some legislation against violent games:

    [url]http://beefjack.com/features/what-do-teachers-really-think-about-videogames/[/url]

    My take? I think that every student in the 21st Century UK is entitled to a rich imaginative life. Of course, through class and gender every student in the UK has a path to the future already laid before them. That cannot be easily changed. However, games - like books and film - can offer purpose and fulfilment far beyond the aspirations of schooling's bells and rows. To paraphrase Alan Bennett's Hector in History Boys, you need the pop-culture to balance, nay, to be an antidote to elitism in high-culture. Never before has there be a generation better able to create its own culture, and its own games and its own imaginative fulfilment. Youtube, Alice, and a myriad of game-making software is freely available. It just needs to be used, and esteemed.

    At the moment, though, such culture manifests mostly through Charlie biting a finger and filming angry teachers. That's funny, but perhaps it's time for games to be seen more as the fulfilling imaginative experiences that they can be.

    Last edited by thequillguy; 04-06-2012 at 09:15 AM. Reason: URL unclear
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    Old 04-06-2012, 09:52 AM
    JackRabbit JackRabbit is offline
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    Did you suggest to any of these parents that if they thought their child was playing too many games to, I don't know, try some actual parenting and install some boundaries to their gaming time?
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    Old 04-06-2012, 10:05 AM
    jon_hill987 jon_hill987 is offline
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    To paraphrase Bender Bending Rodríguez...

    Have you ever tried simply turning off the console, sitting down with your children, and hitting them?
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    Old 04-06-2012, 10:07 AM
    Cartoon Head Cartoon Head is offline
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    You would think more teachers would encourage computer games as they require interaction and thought unlike TV, movies, music and books where you just absorb what is being presented to you. Problem solving and decision making combined with a good story and moral choices is more beneficial than watching Eastenders or Jeremy Kyle.

    Some people are just ignorant of other ways of thinking and teach how they were taught as THE way to do things. Too many teachers clock in and clock out just to get a paycheck.
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    Old 04-06-2012, 10:42 AM
    Belimawr Belimawr is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jon_hill987 View Post
    To paraphrase Bender Bending Rodríguez...

    Have you ever tried simply turning off the console, sitting down with your children, and hitting them?
    Lol

    10 chars.
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    Old 04-06-2012, 10:53 AM
    DuddBudda DuddBudda is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cartoon Head View Post
    computer games require interaction and thought unlike TV, movies, music and books
    well that depends what you read, hear, watch and play as much as how you play, watch, listen and read

    I play plot-driven games the same way I watch TV and movies or listen to lyrics, all of which are extensions of how I read; critcally, analytically

    quite the opposite state applies to shooters, racers and strategies; in these my mind empties (well, apart from vital and affirming rage) and instinct takes over - I think a good racer is as close to a 'zen' state as I'll ever get, existing only as an input for a lap time
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    Old 04-06-2012, 02:45 PM
    Swiss Swiss is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DuddBudda View Post
    well that depends what you read, hear, watch and play as much as how you play, watch, listen and read

    I play plot-driven games the same way I watch TV and movies or listen to lyrics, all of which are extensions of how I read; critcally, analytically

    quite the opposite state applies to shooters, racers and strategies; in these my mind empties (well, apart from vital and affirming rage) and instinct takes over - I think a good racer is as close to a 'zen' state as I'll ever get, existing only as an input for a lap time
    Your mind doesn't really "empty" though, it's doing constant work, you're just not consciously thinking or engaging an analytic part of your mind. Kind of like learning to play a musical instrument, you don't think too much, but you're still learning.

    I'm sure there's some learning involved in TV, but it's more difficult to measure.
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    Old 04-06-2012, 02:47 PM
    Megazell Megazell is offline
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    My kid's school actually have a gaming time after school program.

    They play the following games:

    Minecraft
    Lego Mindstorms (not a game but they have it listed as such)
    Dwarf Fortress
    Toblo
    UT GOTY (for the age 13 and older kids who's parents have signed consent)

    All of the kids in the program have to have a B+ average and their parents have to do 10 hours of community service with the school.

    A lot of other schools have a similar programs throughout the city, mostly it's private schools with some charter schools.
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    Old 04-06-2012, 02:52 PM
    Swiss Swiss is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Megazell View Post
    Dwarf Fortress
    These kids are smarter than I am.
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    Old 04-06-2012, 02:55 PM
    SAeN SAeN is offline
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Megazell View Post
    Dwarf Fortress
    Amazing. Probably best that the parents don't find out what goes on in it though. I find it hilarious that UT needed consent. If any game was going to give you ideas its DF.

    Props for getting them to play the 'good' UT though.
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